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Working Paper

Financial openness of China and India: Implications for capital account liberalisation

We gauge the de-facto capital account openness of the Chinese and Indian economies by testing the law of one price on the basis of onshore and offshore price gaps for three key financial instruments. Generally, the three measures show both economies becoming more financially open over time. Over the past decade, the Indian economy on average appears to be more open financially than the Chinese economy, but China seems to be catching up with India in the wake of the global financial crisis. Both have more work to do to open their capital accounts.

By: and Date: May 14, 2014 Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation

See comment by Guonan Ma China’s financial liberalisation: interest rate deregulation or currency flexibility first?

In this working paper we gauge the de-facto capital account openness of the Chinese and Indian economies by testing the law of one price on the basis of onshore and offshore price gaps for three key financial instruments. Generally, the three measures show both economies becoming more financially open over time. Over the past decade, the Indian economy on average appears to be more open financially than the Chinese economy, but China seems to be catching up with India in the wake of the global financial crisis. Both have more work to do to open their capital accounts.

Our price-based measures suggest strong inward pressure on Chinese money markets, in contrast to the consensus projection that China is likely to experience net private capital outflows when it thoroughly opens up financially. Policymakers need to monitor and to manage the risks along the dynamic path of capital account liberalization.

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Opinion

What can the EU do to keep its firms globally relevant?

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Past Event

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Past Event

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The world’s response to China’s Belt and Road Initiative

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Podcast

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By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: February 7, 2019
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Working Paper

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Blog Post

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Opinion

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Policy Contribution

The Belt and Road turns five

Five years after its launch, Michael Baltensperger and Uri Dadush reflect on China’s Belt and Road Initiative. The plan to revive ancient trade routes has the potential to enhance development prospects across the world and in China, but that potential might not be realised because the BRI’s objectives are too broad and ill-defined, and its execution is too often non-transparent, lacking in due diligence and uncoordinated.

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Opinion

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Podcast

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By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: January 8, 2019
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Policy Contribution

Is the European automotive industry ready for the global electric vehicle revolution?

This Policy Contribution investigates the position of the European automotive industry in a scenario in which electrification substantially progresses. Europe cannot follow China in the adoption of centrally-planned industrial policy measures. But it certainly can and should do more to stimulate the transformation of its automotive industry through more ambitious policies.

By: Gustav Fredriksson, Alexander Roth, Simone Tagliapietra and Reinhilde Veugelers Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: December 20, 2018
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