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Competitive gains in the Economic and Monetary Union

This event was organised in the frame of the 10th Anniversary of Bruegel. It brought together a panel of high level economic experts to discuss the competitive gains achievable through reinforcing the Internal Market and structural reforms.

By: Date: July 22, 2015 Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance

 

This event was organised in the frame of the 10th Anniversary of Bruegel. It brought together a panel of high level economic experts to discuss the competitive gains achievable through reinforcing the Internal Market and structural reforms.

The aim was to take a broad perspective on the possible consequences for employment and growth. It particularly focused on the far-reaching service sector measures that are already on the political agenda in Spain and the EU, and which will be implemented during the coming years.

The panel focused on three interrelated topics:

  1. Gains in competitiveness through structural reforms. What has been the effect of structural reforms implemented in recent years? Which reforms were driven by the EU, which by its member states, and how do they interact?
  2. The Internal Market Strategy. How can Europe increase the impact of competitive gains through real integration of markets (the Internal Market Agenda)?
  3. The key role of services in the promotion of industrialisation: What is the Internal Market Strategy on services? How do we set priorities for better regulation in an era of new business models and “the sharing economy”

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