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Working Paper

Macroprudential supervision: from theory to policy

While there is now consensus that financial supervision has to focus on the aggregate (macroprudential), in addition to the individual (microprudential), there is no agreed macroprudential framework for measuring financial imbalances and applying policies to correct such imbalances. This paper focuses on these two open questions in the so-called time dimension of macroprudential policy.

By: and Date: November 25, 2015 Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation

Highlights

Financial supervision focuses on the aggregate (macroprudential) in addition to the individual (microprudential). But an agreed framework for measuring and addressing financial imbalances is lacking. We propose a holistic approach for the financial system as a whole, beyond banking.

Building on our model of financial amplification, the financial cycle is the key variable for measuring financial imbalances. The cycle can be curbed by leverage restrictions that might vary across countries and sectors.

Macroprudential supervision has been discussed since the onset of the great financial crisis, but policymakers are still slow on the ground. While the current monetary policy stance of quantitative easing may be needed to stimulate subdued growth, the risk of financial booms is increasing. We make concrete policy proposals for the design of macroprudential instruments to simplify the current framework and make it more consistent.

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Blog Post

Macroprudential policy: The Maginot line of financial stability

The ability of macroprudential policies to assure financial stability and thus leave central banks free to assign the interest rate tool exclusively to price stability is unproven. As the Maginot line did not protect France from a German invasion in WWII, so macroprudential policy may not be sufficient to counter financial instability. Central banks should prepare to deal with dilemmas in the use of the interest rate.

By: Francesco Papadia Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 17, 2018
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Opinion

Opportunities and risks in Europe in 2018

The new year could very well see the positive story of 2017 continue in Europe – but a number of looming policy and political problems cannot be ignored.

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: December 30, 2017
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Opinion

Chinese banks’ improved asset quality cannot hide other phantoms

The recent improvement in asset quality cannot mask other growing concerns in China’s banking sector. Beyond liquidity concerns, other structural issues such as low profitability and insufficient generation of organic capital, are emerging.

By: Alicia García-Herrero and Gary Ng Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation, Global Economics & Governance Date: December 20, 2017
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Policy Contribution

European Parliament

How should the European Central Bank ‘normalise’ its monetary policy?

During the crisis, the ECB resorted to a number of unconventional monetary tools. This paper discusses how to phase out these policies and what the ‘new normal’ in monetary policy should look like.

By: Grégory Claeys and Maria Demertzis Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, European Parliament, Testimonies Date: November 23, 2017
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Blog Post

The Eurosystem - Too opaque and costly?

The Eurosystem gets a lot of attention from academics and the media, but they largely focus on its statutory objective of maintaining price stability. There is much less interest in its transparency and operational efficiency. We analyse these issues, and find that the Eurosystem is less transparent and operates with significantly higher costs and headcount than the US Federal Reserve System.

By: Francesco Papadia and Alexander Roth Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: November 6, 2017
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External Publication

European Parliament

The single monetary policy and its decentralised implementation: An assessment

This paper assesses the decentralised implementation of monetary policy by the Eurosystem in terms of its transparency, efficiency and simplicity. Compared to the Fed, the Eurosystem seems to have higher staff numbers and operational costs for similar tasks.

By: Francesco Papadia and Alexander Roth Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, European Parliament, Testimonies Date: October 4, 2017
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Past Event

Past Event

Europe and Japan: Monetary policies in the age of uncertainty

The 5th Bruegel - Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University conference will focus on monetary policy.

Speakers: Kosuke Aoki, Ulrich Bindseil, Grégory Claeys, Zsolt Darvas, Ester Faia, Lex Hoogduin, Martin Hellwig, Miles Kimball, Eric Lonergan, Benoît Mojon, Tamotsu Nakamura, Marianne Nessén, Athanasios Orphanides, Wataru Takahashi, Tokiko Shimizu and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: Global Economics & Governance Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: October 2, 2017
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Blog Post

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What’s at stake: the literature on monetary policy spillovers is abundant of studies investigating the impact of the US Federal Reserve’s monetary policy announcements and actions on emerging market economies. More recently, economists have been investigating the effect of the ECB’s credit easing as well.

By: Silvia Merler Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 24, 2017
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Blog Post

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By: Silvia Merler Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 10, 2017
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Past Event

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Can EMU survive a multi speed Europe?

On 6 April Bruegel, as in previous years, hosted the presentation of the Euro Yearbook, a collection of experts’ insights on the construction of the European Monetary Union through 2016.

Speakers: Pablo Zalba Bidegain, Maria Demertzis, Fernando Fernandez, Javier Méndez Llera, Karl Pichelmann and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: April 6, 2017
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Past Event

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Central bank communication in a low interest rate environment

At this event, we are pleased to welcome Mr. Benoît Coeuré, Member of the Executive Board of the European Central Bank at Bruegel.

Speakers: Benoît Coeuré and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: March 31, 2017
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Blog Post

Who would bet on currency unions after EMU crisis?

The European Monetary Union (EMU) was founded with the idea that nominal convergence would bring real convergence, but structural differences between members have proven wide enough to generate lasting asymmetric negative shocks across the euro area.

By: Alicia García-Herrero and David Martínez Turégano Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: March 29, 2017
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