Parliamentary Testimony

Global economic governance: Italy’s role in the G7 and G20

This paper was produced for the Italian Parliament and Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

By: and Date: December 16, 2015 Topic: Italian Parliament

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The content of this paper is summarised in the blog post “A vade mecum for Italy’s G7 presidency”. Click here to read it.

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