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What role for the financial markets in Europe?

The European financial system is too strongly bank-based. How can it be rebalanced to become favourable to growth and employment again? (This paper is only available in French).

By: Date: November 16, 2016 Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation

This paper is published in Revue trimestrielle de l’association d’économie financière, no. 123, October 2016.

Please note that this paper is only available in French.

  • An efficient financial system is essential to the good functioning of the economy. The various functions of the financial system can be provided either by banks or by markets.
  • These two sources of funding are complementary and the exact composition between banks and markets is usually not decisive.
  • Nevertheless, the European financial system is too strongly bank-based and its markets are underdeveloped. It is absolutely necessary to rebalance it to make it favourable to growth and employment again.
  • Developing and integrating European financial markets will allow firms to access a diversified source of funding, adapted to their needs, and increase risk-sharing between European countries to help them absorb shocks.
  • The capital markets union is a long-term project, but a series of ambitious reforms and a new institutional architecture could steer the financial system in the right direction.
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