External Publication

EU economic governance: euro area periphery lessons for Central and Eastern European countries

An analysis of macroecnomic developments shows that Central and Eastern European (CEE) EU member states fared much better in the aftermath of the crisis compared to euro-area periphery countries. Furthermore, they have a better chance to avoid the problems that the euro-periphery countries faced before the crisis.

By: Date: December 9, 2016 Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance

EU economic governance: euro area periphery lessons for Central and Eastern European countries was published as a chapter in the book Boosting European Competitiveness:The Role of CESEE Countries edited by Marek Belka, Ewald Nowotny, Pawel Samecki and Doris Ritzberger-Grünwald and published by Edward Elgar Publishing.

In the chapter EU economic governance: euro area periphery lessons for Central and Eastern European countries, Zsolt Darvas draws parallels between the macroeconomic developments of the euro-area periphery and Central and Eastern European (CEE) EU member states. Despite several notable similar features in the period preceding the global and European financial crises, CEE member states fared much better in the aftermath of the crisis.

The chapter then assesses the role played by the European economic governance in striving for good policies. It concludes that the European economic governance failed before the crisis and while the new framework has improved significantly, it has been rather ineffective so far.

The most promising new element is the establishment of the national competitiveness authorities, which can improve the diagnosis of possible competitiveness problems and can help to identify remedies, even though it is unlikely that their network will help to better internalise cross-country spill-over effects.

Finally, the chapter concludes that once they join the euro, CEE countries have a better chance to avoid the problems that the euro-periphery countries faced in the pre-crisis period. A good example is Slovakia, a country that is thriving within the euro area, despite the fact that it joined the euro perhaps at the worst possible time, shortly after the late-2008 collapse of Lehman Brothers.

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Opinion

Portugal in a new context of capital flows

The euro area is now the world’s largest exporter of capital. Here we look at the post-crisis transition of one euro-area country – Portugal – from net recipient to net provider of capital, in the context of the European Commission’s plans for deeper capital markets.

By: Inês Goncalves Raposo Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: February 20, 2018
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Blog Post

Green bonds: who is to certify ‘sustainability’?

Poland’s issue of a green bond earlier this month was the country’s second financing of this type, and the first ever repeat issue by a sovereign. It has revived the debate as to whether there should be a single regulatory standard to certify the environmental quality of financial assets. This will be a key issue for the EU’s sustainable finance strategy which is due to be released shortly.

By: Alexander Lehmann Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: February 19, 2018
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Upcoming Event

Feb
27
12:30

Bruegel - Financial Times Forum: The future of euro-area governance

The third event in the Bruegel - Financial Times Forum series will look into the future of euro-area governance.

Speakers: Maria Demertzis, Gideon Rachman, Manfred Weber and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels
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Policy Contribution

Tales from a crisis: diverging narratives of the euro area

Who gets the blame for the crisis? How did narratives of the crisis develop since 2007? The authors of this paper tried to identify the key crisis-related topics in articles from four opinion-forming newspapers in the largest euro-area countries.

By: Henrik Müller, Giuseppe Porcaro and Gerret von Nordheim Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 15, 2018
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Blog Post

Trust in the EU? The key obstacle to reform

The challenges that Europe faces both from within and from outside require immediate, concerted counter-efforts. While efforts to advance the European economic architecture are desirable and useful, can Europe realistically attempt to integrate further on the basis of such little trust?

By: Maria Demertzis Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 9, 2018
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Podcast

Podcast

European Parliament: More representative post-Brexit?

Bruegel director Guntram Wolff features in this episode of 'The Sound of Economics', highlighting how a reallocation of seats in the European Parliament following Brexit provides the opportunity to make the institution more representative of EU citizens.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 5, 2018
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Blog Post

Difficulties and opportunities in reallocating European Parliament seats after Brexit

The European Parliament must carefully consider the reallocation of seats after Brexit, allowing for a potential shift in political alignment and working within parameters already agreed with Member States.

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 5, 2018
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Opinion

Your job description, Mr. Centeno

Here’s how you run the Eurogroup.

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 30, 2018
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Blueprint

People on the move: migration and mobility in the European Union

Migration is one of the most divisive policy topics in today’s Europe. In this publication, the authors assess the immigration challenge that the EU faces, analyse public perceptions, map migration patterns in the EU and review the literature on the economic impact of immigration to reflect on immigration policies and the role of private institutions in fostering integration.

By: Uuriintuya Batsaikhan, Zsolt Darvas and Inês Goncalves Raposo Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 22, 2018
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External Publication

Reconciling risk sharing with market discipline: A constructive approach to euro area reform

This publication, written by a group of independent French and German economists, proposes six reforms which, if delivered as a package, would improve the Eurozone’s financial stability, political cohesion, and potential for delivering prosperity to its citizens, all while addressing the priorities and concerns of participating countries.

By: Agnès Bénassy-Quéré, Markus K. Brunnermeier, Henrik Enderlein, Emmanuel Farhi, Marcel Fratzscher, Clemens Fuest, Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas, Philippe Martin, Jean Pisani-Ferry, Hélène Rey, Isabel Schnabel, Nicolas Véron, Beatrice Weder di Mauro and Jeromin Zettelmeyer Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 17, 2018
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External Publication

Analysis of development in EU capital flows in the global context

The monitoring and analysis of capital movements is essential for policymakers, given that capital flows can have welfare implications. This report, commissioned by the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Financial Stability, Financial Services and Capital Markets Union, aims to analyse capital movements in the European Union in a global context.

By: Grégory Claeys, Maria Demertzis, Konstantinos Efstathiou, Inês Goncalves Raposo, Pia Hüttl and Alexander Lehmann Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: January 15, 2018
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Blog Post

Bad News and Good News for the Single Resolution Board

A first report on a key plank of the European Union’s banking union reflects on shortcomings thus far, but also suggests that recent improvements might ultimately lead the SRB to be successful in its critical missions.

By: Nicolas Véron Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: January 15, 2018
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