Blog Post

Trade flows between the US, UK and EU27: what goes where?

As US President Trump and UK Prime Minister Theresa May meet in Washington, Bruegel researchers look at bilateral trade flows between the US, UK and EU27.

By: and Date: January 27, 2017 Topic: Global Economics & Governance

Donald Trump is President of the United States and the United Kingdom is leaving the European Union. It is reasonable to expect disturbances in the global trade order. Prime Minister May’s meeting with President Trump puts trade relations between the EU, the US and the UK in the spotlight. To inform this debate, it is certainly useful to measure the forces at play on the international trade chessboard.

The chord diagram below shows total imports and exports for the three considered countries/blocs. Bilateral trade flows are indicated by the ‘chord’ connecting two trade partners, with the width of the chord displaying the value of the flow. Data are based on UN Comtrade and refer to trade in goods among the world’s 43 largest economies.

Source: GED Viz, a web tool for visualizing complex economic relations developed by Bertelsmann Stiftung.

Note: each bilateral trade flow relies on data reported in import statistics, which are considered more accurate given the custom systems in place to collect tariff revenues.

Trade flows between the EU, the US and the UK

 

From the British perspective, the other 27 members of the EU represent the largest destination market for exports and the most important source of imports. However, bilateral trade in goods between UK and the rest of the EU is not balanced. As a matter of fact, the UK ran a trade deficit with the rest of the EU amounting to US$ 151 billion in 2015. This deficit has increased from US$ 139 billion to US$ 151 billion since 2014 (based on import statistics).

The UK’s trade flows with the US are much smaller than with the EU27. The UK’s goods exports to the US are only one quarter of what it exports to the EU27. And imports from the US are about one sixth of imports from the EU27.

From the US perspective, the UK is a small trading partner – also in relation to the EU27. Among its trade with the largest 43 economies, only 4.9% of US goods exports go to the UK. 20.8% go to the rest of the EU.


Republishing and referencing

Bruegel considers itself a public good and takes no institutional standpoint. Anyone is free to republish and/or quote this post without prior consent. Please provide a full reference, clearly stating Bruegel and the relevant author as the source, and include a prominent hyperlink to the original post.

View comments
Read about event More on this topic

Past Event

Past Event

Is there life After TTIP? The future of transatlantic economic relations

The partnership between North America and Europe is becoming unsettled and uncertain. How can we deal with this new situation that threatens the prosperity and ultimately the position of North America and Europe in the global economy.

Speakers: Maria Demertzis, Daniel S. Hamilton, Luisa Santos and André Sapir Topic: Global Economics & Governance Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: February 19, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

Brexit consequences for EU climate and energy policy

Bruegel fellow Georg Zachmann joins Richard Tol, professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Sussex, and Pieter-Willem Lemmens, head of analysis at the climate policy think-tank Sandbag, for this episode of 'The Sound of Economics', to discuss the impact of Brexit on climate and energy policy in the European Union.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Energy & Climate Date: February 15, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

Is it a Transatlantic, Transpacific or Eurasian global economy?

A look at the data on bilateral trade, services, investment and protectionism between Asia, Europe and the US in recent years gives some indication of the future shape of the world economy.

By: Nicolas Moës Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: February 14, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

European Parliament: More representative post-Brexit?

Bruegel director Guntram Wolff features in this episode of 'The Sound of Economics', highlighting how a reallocation of seats in the European Parliament following Brexit provides the opportunity to make the institution more representative of EU citizens.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 5, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

Difficulties and opportunities in reallocating European Parliament seats after Brexit

The European Parliament must carefully consider the reallocation of seats after Brexit, allowing for a potential shift in political alignment and working within parameters already agreed with Member States.

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 5, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Opinion

The International Economic Consequences of Mr. Trump

What has fundamentally changed with the Trump administration is not that it behaves more selfishly than its predecessors, but that it seems unconvinced that the global system serves US strategic interests. For the rest of the world, the key question is whether the global system is resilient enough to survive its creator’s withdrawal.

By: Jean Pisani-Ferry Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: January 31, 2018
Read article More on this topic

Blog Post

Does the European Parliament miss an opportunity to reform after Brexit?

While Brexit negotiations are beginning to progress, the European Parliament is preparing to vote on the possible reallocation of seats following the UK's departure. With many of the current proposals reflecting Member States' concerns about losing seats, this paper advocates for options that could better achieve equality of representation even within the constraints of the EU treaties.

By: Robert Kalcik, Nicolas Moës and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 10, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Opinion

Opportunities and risks in Europe in 2018

The new year could very well see the positive story of 2017 continue in Europe – but a number of looming policy and political problems cannot be ignored.

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: December 30, 2017
Read article Download PDF

External Publication

European Parliament

The Impact of Brexit on the EU Energy System

What will be the impact of Brexit on the EU energy system? With or without the UK, the EU will be able to complete its market, to achieve its climate and energy targets with feasible readjustments, and to maintain supply security

By: Gustav Fredriksson, Alexander Roth, Simone Tagliapietra and Georg Zachmann Topic: Energy & Climate, European Macroeconomics & Governance, European Parliament, Testimonies Date: December 19, 2017
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

Optimistic UK business confidence indicators predict smooth Brexit

UK business confidence indicators hardly fell after the Brexit vote in 2016 and have been increasing steadily since. The most likely reason is an expectation of smooth Brexit deal, especially for industry, while there is more uncertainty for services.

By: Zsolt Darvas Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: December 19, 2017
Read article More on this topic

Blog Post

Brexit, phase two (and beyond): The future of the EU-UK relationship

Whether it looks more like ‘CETA-plus’ or ‘EEA-minus’, the trade deal that emerges from phase two of the Brexit negotiations should not be the limit of ambition for future partnership between the EU and the UK

By: Maria Demertzis and André Sapir Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: December 13, 2017
Read about event More on this topic

Past Event

Past Event

The impact of Brexit for Research & Innovation in Europe

This event featured a new and interactive format, with a restricted and high-level on-site audience and in parallel, it has been livestreamed on our website to remain public and attract the widest participation.

Speakers: Alastair Buchan, Matt Dann, David Earnshaw, Kurt Deketelaere, Maryline Fiaschi, Martin Muller, Christian Naczinsky and Reinhilde Veugelers Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: December 12, 2017
Load more posts