Blog Post

29 charts that explain Brexit

From financial services to the creative industry, from trade to migration, this selection of charts maps out the troubled waters of Brexit, and provides a compass through blogs and publications Bruegel scholars have written on the topic.

By: Date: March 28, 2017 Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance

From: The day after Brexit: what do we know? by Uuriintuya Batsaikhan



From: What is the age profile of UK immigrants? by Zsolt Darvas

From: Fog in the Channel: Brexit through the eyes of international trade by Pia Hüttl and Silvia Merler



From: Trade flows between the US, UK and EU27: what goes where? by Filippo Biondi and Robert Kalcik

Trade flows between the EU, the US and the UK

 

From: Brexit: who trades what with the UK? by Silvia Merler



From: Should the UK pull out of the EU customs union? by André Sapir

From: What consequences would a post-Brexit China-UK trade deal have for the EU? by Alicia Garcia-Herrero and Jianwei Xu

uk china

From: Lost passports: a guide to the Brexit fallout for the City of London by Dirk Schoenmaker

From: Brexit endangers London’s status as a financial hub by Pia Hüttl and Silvia Merler



From: Northern Ireland and EU funds by Pia Hüttl and Jaume Marti Romero

ni

From: Brexit and the European financial system: mapping markets, players and job by Uuriintuya Batsaikhan, Robert Kalcik, Dirk Schoenmaker

finance

From: Making the best of Brexit for the EU27 financial system by André Sapir, Dirk Schoenmaker, Nicolas Veron

markets

From: The impact of Brexit on UK tertiary education and R&D by Maria Demertzis and Enrico Nano

From: The UK’s Brexit bill: could EU assets partially offset liabilities? by Zsolt Darvas, Konstantinos Efstathiou, Inês Goncalves Raposo

From: Single market access from outside the EU: three key prerequisites by Zsolt Darvas

 


From: Questionable immigration claims in the Brexit white paper by Zsolt Darvas

From: Tweeting Brexit: Narative building and sentiment analysis by Henrik Müller and Giuseppe Porcaro

The figure depicts the results by showing the overall mood in the “Twittersphere” over time. Values of zero represent a balanced view where tweets containing a predominantly pro-Brexit (positive values) and a pro-Remain stance (negative values) offset each other.

tweet

 


Republishing and referencing

Bruegel considers itself a public good and takes no institutional standpoint. Anyone is free to republish and/or quote this post without prior consent. Please provide a full reference, clearly stating Bruegel and the relevant author as the source, and include a prominent hyperlink to the original post.

View comments
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

Brexit consequences for EU climate and energy policy

Bruegel fellow Georg Zachmann joins Richard Tol, professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Sussex, and Pieter-Willem Lemmens, head of analysis at the climate policy think-tank Sandbag, for this episode of 'The Sound of Economics', to discuss the impact of Brexit on climate and energy policy in the European Union.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Energy & Climate Date: February 15, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

European Parliament: More representative post-Brexit?

Bruegel director Guntram Wolff features in this episode of 'The Sound of Economics', highlighting how a reallocation of seats in the European Parliament following Brexit provides the opportunity to make the institution more representative of EU citizens.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 5, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

Difficulties and opportunities in reallocating European Parliament seats after Brexit

The European Parliament must carefully consider the reallocation of seats after Brexit, allowing for a potential shift in political alignment and working within parameters already agreed with Member States.

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 5, 2018
Read article More on this topic

Blog Post

Does the European Parliament miss an opportunity to reform after Brexit?

While Brexit negotiations are beginning to progress, the European Parliament is preparing to vote on the possible reallocation of seats following the UK's departure. With many of the current proposals reflecting Member States' concerns about losing seats, this paper advocates for options that could better achieve equality of representation even within the constraints of the EU treaties.

By: Robert Kalcik, Nicolas Moës and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 10, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Opinion

Opportunities and risks in Europe in 2018

The new year could very well see the positive story of 2017 continue in Europe – but a number of looming policy and political problems cannot be ignored.

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: December 30, 2017
Read article Download PDF

External Publication

European Parliament

The Impact of Brexit on the EU Energy System

What will be the impact of Brexit on the EU energy system? With or without the UK, the EU will be able to complete its market, to achieve its climate and energy targets with feasible readjustments, and to maintain supply security

By: Gustav Fredriksson, Alexander Roth, Simone Tagliapietra and Georg Zachmann Topic: Energy & Climate, European Macroeconomics & Governance, European Parliament, Testimonies Date: December 19, 2017
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

Optimistic UK business confidence indicators predict smooth Brexit

UK business confidence indicators hardly fell after the Brexit vote in 2016 and have been increasing steadily since. The most likely reason is an expectation of smooth Brexit deal, especially for industry, while there is more uncertainty for services.

By: Zsolt Darvas Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: December 19, 2017
Read article More on this topic

Blog Post

Brexit, phase two (and beyond): The future of the EU-UK relationship

Whether it looks more like ‘CETA-plus’ or ‘EEA-minus’, the trade deal that emerges from phase two of the Brexit negotiations should not be the limit of ambition for future partnership between the EU and the UK

By: Maria Demertzis and André Sapir Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: December 13, 2017
Read about event More on this topic

Past Event

Past Event

The impact of Brexit for Research & Innovation in Europe

This event featured a new and interactive format, with a restricted and high-level on-site audience and in parallel, it has been livestreamed on our website to remain public and attract the widest participation.

Speakers: Alastair Buchan, Matt Dann, David Earnshaw, Kurt Deketelaere, Maryline Fiaschi, Martin Muller, Christian Naczinsky and Reinhilde Veugelers Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: December 12, 2017
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Opinion

Brexit: When the banks leave

More than a tenth of the City’s business is now bound to go, but how much worse could things get?

By: Nicolas Véron Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: December 1, 2017
Read article More by this author

Blog Post

The impact of Brexit on the Irish energy system – pragmatism vs. principles

Brexit promises pain for Ireland that could be cut off from the EU internal market and be left exposed to market instability in the UK. Georg Zachmann assesses the scale of the possible damage for Ireland, and how the UK and EU might use the special energy relations on the Irish island to commit to a pragmatic solution.

By: Georg Zachmann Topic: Energy & Climate, European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: November 21, 2017
Read article Download PDF

Policy Contribution

A ‘twin peaks’ vision for Europe

The organisation of the European Supervisory Authorities (ESAs) is based on a sectoral approach with one ESA for each sector, with separate authorities for banking, insurance and securities and markets. But is this sectoral approach still valid? This Policy Contribution outlines a long-term vision for the supervisory architecture in the European Union.

By: Dirk Schoenmaker and Nicolas Véron Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Finance & Financial Regulation Date: November 13, 2017
Load more posts