Podcast

How will Europe’s banking system respond to future challenges?

After the financial crisis, the EU has taken measures to create conditions for a safer banking sector. One of the key measures to do that is the creation of the banking union. How successful has the implementation of the new framework been so far? How will issues in the Italian banking sector be addressed? And how will Brexit change the European banking sector?

By: Date: May 5, 2017 Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation

This episode of The Sound of Economics focuses on the banking system in Europe and some of the challenges it is facing. The financial crisis made it clear that more should be done to create conditions for a safer financial system. The EU has taken measures to do that, and one of those measures is the creation of the banking union, which implies bringing all instruments of the banking sector policy to the eurozone level.

Nicolas Véron explains to which extent the banking union has been completed, and shares his assessment on how successful the implementation of the new framework has been so far. While there are some aspects of the framework that can already be assessed, it seems that addressing the issues of Italian banks will be the first big test of how it will function in practice. Silvia Merler shares her opinion on the situation in Italy and reforms that have been taken so far.

One of the key aspects of the banking union is the creation of the European deposit insurance scheme, which has proven to be the most challenging part of completing the banking union. Dirk Schoenmaker reflects on the topic.

Our guests go on to discuss how Brexit will affect the European banking and which risks and opportunities it might bring. Finally, they identify some of the challenges that the European banking system will have to address in the longer run.

SPEAKERS

Silvia Merler, Affiliate Fellow

Dirk Schoenmaker, Senior Fellow

Nicolas Véron, Senior Fellow

CREDITS

Presented and produced by Antonija Parat

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