Podcast

What’s next for France and Europe?

We host a conversation between Jean Pisani-Ferry and Guntram Wolff to discuss what the French election result will mean for France and Europe.

By: Date: May 11, 2017 Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance

For more on this topic, see our event with the Financial Times on the future of Europe after the French election.

In this episode of The Sound of Economics, we host a conversation between Jean Pisani-Ferry and Guntram Wolff on the future of Europe after the French election.

Our guests discuss how to address the urban-rural divide that was visible not only in the French election, but also in the Brexit vote and the US election. They also address Emmanuel Macron’s pro-European platform, and discuss the significance of winning on such a platform. Finally, they speak about what Macron’s victory will mean for the future of the eurozone.

SPEAKERS

Guntram Wolff, Director, Bruegel

Jean Pisani-Ferry, Director for Programme and Ideas of Emmanuel Macron’s presidential campaign

CREDITS

Presented by Bryn Watkins

Produced by Giuseppe Porcaro

View comments
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

Director’s Cut: What risk does Italy’s new government pose to the euro area?

In this Director’s Cut of ‘The Sound of Economics’ podcast, Guntram Wolff discusses with Bruegel senior fellow Francesco Papadia the potential consequences of Italy’s new coalition government – both for Italy itself, and for the euro area as a whole.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: May 25, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Opinion

Make euro-area sovereign bonds safe again

In their recent Policy Insight, the team of French and German authors suggest introducing sovereign bond-backed securities to play the role of safe asset in the euro area. This column, part of the VoxEU debate on euro-area reform, argues that an improved euro-area architecture would, in the long run, make all euro-area sovereign bonds safer, and thus make the provision of safe assets through untested and potentially disruptive sovereign bond-backed securities unnecessary.

By: Grégory Claeys Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: May 25, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Opinion

Fiscal rules and the role of the Commission

The proposals on fiscal frameworks and rules in the recent CEPR Policy Insight on euro-area reform showcase the multiple dimensions of the fundamental dilemmas we are confronted with in the governance of the euro area. This column, part of the VoxEU debate on Euro Area Reform, looks at the challenges to the central role of the Commission that have arisen as the rules-based fiscal framework has been severely compromised.

By: Thomas Wieser Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: May 22, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

Director's Cut: Post-crisis prognosis for macroeconomics

The global financial crisis prompted the field of macroeconomics to rethink its methods. In this Director's Cut of 'The Sound of Economics', Bruegel deputy director Maria Demertzis addresses the changes made and the problems still unresolved, in conversation with Nicola Viegi, South African Reserve Bank professor of monetary economics at the University of Pretoria, and Frank Smets, director general of economics at the European Central Bank.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: May 15, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

Director’s Cut: EU policy priorities towards Capital Markets Union

In this Director’s Cut of ‘The Sound of Economics’ podcast, Bruegel director Guntram Wolff hosts a conversation with the European Commission’s Vice-President Valdis Dombrovskis regarding the policy measures required to make tangible progress with the Capital Markets Union project.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: May 8, 2018
Read article More on this topic

Blog Post

How large is the proposed decline in EU agricultural and cohesion spending?

Cohesion spending is proposed by the Commission to increase by 6% in the next MFF, but inflation is expected to reduce the real value of such spending by 7%. The gradual convergence of the least developed regions to the EU average reduces the need for cohesion spending. Common agricultural spending is proposed to be cut by 4%, while if we consider inflation too, the reduction in real value is 15%.

By: Zsolt Darvas and Nicolas Moës Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: May 4, 2018
Read article More by this author

Blog Post

Europe needs a broader discussion of its future

When thinking about what will determine the prosperity and well-being of citizens living in the euro area, five issues are central. This column, part of VoxEU's Euro Area Reform debate, argues that the important CEPR Policy Insight by a team of French and German economists makes an important contribution to two of them, but leaves aside some of the most crucial ones: European public goods, a proper fiscal stance and major national reforms. It also argues that its compromise on sovereign debt appears unbalanced.

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Finance & Financial Regulation Date: May 4, 2018
Read article Download PDF More on this topic

Policy Contribution

Making a reality of Europe’s Capital Markets Union

It is high time to make the CMU project real.The authors of this publication suggest that capital markets will only transform with concrete action and that ESMA reform should be a priority but cannot be the only one. Policymakers need to set priorities that will move the project forward.

By: André Sapir, Nicolas Véron and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: April 27, 2018
Read article Download PDF More on this topic

Working Paper

State contingent debt as insurance for euro-area sovereigns

Since the financial crisis, EU countries' economies have recovered to the point that they are exiting their adjustment programmes. Institutional stability mechanisms have been improved at the European level, with the promotion of the banking union and the establishment of a European Monetary Fund, for instance. However, the authors argue that such crisis contingencies should include markets in their risk-sharing, which would require better coordination with institutions.

By: Maria Demertzis and Stavros Zenios Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: April 26, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

How to reform European transport and tackle rising emissions

The transport sector is the Europe's biggest obstacle to meeting its climate-change targets. But there are several ways in which the EU can take the initiative and lead both its citizens and its automotive industry in a cleaner direction. Bruegel fellows Simone Tagliapietra and Georg Zachmann discuss their research and policy conclusions in this episode of 'The Sound of Economics'

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Energy & Climate Date: April 24, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

Building a stable european deposit insurance scheme

Deposit insurance, like any insurance scheme, raises moral hazard concerns. Such concerns arising from European deposit insurance can be alleviated through a country-specific component in the risk-based premium for deposit insurance and limits on sovereign bond exposures on bank balance sheets. This column argues, however, that proposals to maintain national compartments in a new European Deposit Insurance Scheme are self-defeating, as such compartments can be destabilising in times of crisis.

By: Dirk Schoenmaker Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: April 19, 2018
Read article More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

Director's Cut: EU risks US tariff pain in standing by the WTO

As global trade war continues to unfold, Bruegel director Guntram Wolff is joined for this Director's Cut of 'The Sound of Economics' podcast by Bernd Lange MEP, chair of the Committee on International Trade (INTA), to discuss Europe's options.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Global Economics & Governance Date: April 18, 2018
Load more posts