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EU–China Economic Relations to 2025. Building a Common Future

The EU and China, as the world’s second and third largest economies, share a responsibility in upholding the rules-based, global free trade system and other forms of multilateral cooperation, especially on combating climate change. This report sets out the main conclusions of a research project between European and Chinese think-tanks, which addresses the prospects for the EU–China economic relationship. A Joint Report by Bruegel, Chatham House, the China Center for International Economic Exchanges and the Institute of Global Economics and Finance at The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

By: , , , and Date: September 13, 2017 Topic: Global Economics & Governance

With global uncertainties on the rise, it has become particularly important for the EU and China to find ways to deepen their bilateral economic cooperation.

The EU and China, as the world’s second and third largest economies, share a responsibility in upholding the rules-based, global free trade system and other forms of multilateral cooperation, especially on combating climate change. Starting from this premise, this report sets out the main conclusions of a research project between European and Chinese think-tanks, which addresses the prospects for the EU–China economic relationship through to 2025.

As the report lays out, the two sides have the opportunity to deepen their cooperation in areas such as trade and investment; infrastructure; energy, the environment and the Paris climate change agreement; science, technology, innovation and industrial cooperation; financial services; people-to-people exchanges; and global governance. In this way, the EU and China can help ensure that global development is stable, strong, balanced and sustainable. The report also discusses the numerous obstacles that stand in between further collaboration.

 

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