Podcast

Director’s Cut: Post-crisis prognosis for macroeconomics

The global financial crisis prompted the field of macroeconomics to rethink its methods. In this Director's Cut of 'The Sound of Economics', Bruegel deputy director Maria Demertzis addresses the changes made and the problems still unresolved, in conversation with Nicola Viegi, South African Reserve Bank professor of monetary economics at the University of Pretoria, and Frank Smets, director general of economics at the European Central Bank.

By: Date: May 15, 2018 Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance


The global financial crisis exposed flaws in the methods and theories of macroeconomics. Certain aspects of the crisis were completely unexpected; other burgeoning problems were flagged up but explained away, and thus allowed to get worse.

As the profession seeks to reinvent itself post-crisis and reassert its worth, what exactly has been learned and what changes have been made to the practice of macroeconomics? New models appear to be flourishing, but debate continues over  whether we have improved our understanding and mitigated the potential for misreading the results that these models present.

In this Director’s Cut of ‘The Sound of Economics’ podcast, Bruegel deputy director hosts a conversation with Nicola Viegi, South African Reserve Bank professor of monetary economics at the University of Pretoria, and Frank Smets, director general of economics at the European Central Bank.

For further reading on this topic, consider our overview of the ‘Rebuilding Macroeconomic Theory Project’  recently concluded by the Oxford Review of Economic Policy, written by Konstantinos Efstathiou.

 

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Podcast

Podcast

Italy's economic and political outlook

In this week's Sound of Economics, Bruegel affiliate fellow, Silvia Merler, is joined by Marcello Minenna, PhD lecturer at the London Graduate School and Head of Quants at Consob, as well as Lorenzo Codogno, LSE visiting professor, to discuss the Italian government's economic outlook in the European context.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 11, 2018
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Podcast

Podcast

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By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: June 27, 2018
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Blog Post

The European Union must defend Andreas Georgiou

Andreas Georgiou’s case raises disturbing questions about the integrity of European statistical processes. Forceful action by EU authorities on Mr Georgiou’s case is long overdue. The European Union also needs to consider reforming its statistical framework to ensure a similar scandal cannot recur.

By: Nicolas Véron Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: June 26, 2018
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Working Paper

EU financial services policy since 2007: crisis, responses and prospects

This paper presents a holistic overview and assessment of the European Union (EU)’s financial services policy since the start of its financial crisis in mid-2007. Its emphasis is on public policy initiatives and developments at the European level, including those specific to the euro area.

By: Nicolas Véron Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: June 21, 2018
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Podcast

Podcast

Director’s Cut: Making Europe financially literate

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By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: June 19, 2018
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Blog Post

Is the ECB collateral framework compromising the safe-asset status of euro-area sovereign bonds?

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By: Grégory Claeys and Inês Goncalves Raposo Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: June 8, 2018
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By: Francesco Papadia and Alexander Roth Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: June 5, 2018
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Podcast

Podcast

Director's Cut: Central banking and the problem of unelected power

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By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation, Global Economics & Governance Date: June 5, 2018
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Blog Post

Italian populism calls for hard choices

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By: Alessio Terzi Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: May 31, 2018
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Podcast

Podcast

Robots: Positive or negative for EU employment?

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By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: May 29, 2018
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External Publication

The changing fortunes of central banking

What are the major challenges of central banks today? This book discusses the developing role of central banks and the policies they pursue in seeking monetary and financial stabilisation, while also giving suggestions for model strategies.

By: Philipp Hartmann, Haizhou Huang and Dirk Schoenmaker Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Finance & Financial Regulation Date: May 29, 2018
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Opinion

How worried should we be about an Italian debt crisis?

Political backlash to slow growth and immigration has produced the least cooperative government imaginable in Italy, a coalition between the left-populist Five Star Movement (M5S) and the right-populist Lega. And borrowing costs have started to rise in reaction. Does this mean that a crisis is imminent? If so, how bad would it be?

By: Silvia Merler, Olivier Blanchard and Jeromin Zettelmeyer Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: May 28, 2018
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