Podcast

Backstage: Implications of the new EU-Japan trade deal

Bruegel senior fellow André Sapir welcomes Tamotsu Nakamura, dean of Kobe University’s Graduate School of Economics, and Maria Åsenius, head of cabinet to European trade commissioner Cecilia Malmström, for a discussion of the EU-Japan economic partnership in the context of heightening global trade tensions.

By: Date: October 4, 2018 Topic: Global Economics & Governance

The EU and Japan have signed a landmark trade deal this summer that will create the world’s largest open economic area.

The economic partnership agreement will be the biggest bilateral trade agreement the EU has ever signed, permitting not only the dropping of tariffs but also regulatory cooperation, as well as a special focus to promote the interests of SMEs.

The trade-positive nature of this agreement goes against the grain of the numerous challenges made to the global multilateral system in recent times, best represented by the tariffs and counter-tariffs imposed by the US and China upon one another.

To explore how this accord suits the EU and Japan, in terms of both the domestic and international interests of each side, Bruegel senior fellow André Sapir welcomes two guests for this edition of the Bruegel Backstage series – Tamotsu Nakamura, dean of Kobe University’s Graduate School of Economics, and Maria Åsenius, head of cabinet to European trade commissioner Cecilia Malmström.

If you are interested in reading more on this topic, we can recommend the research paper on the EU-Japan agreement that Bruegel has submitted to the European Parliament, by André Sapir, Sonali Chowdhry and Alessio Terzi.

You might also consider our previous podcast on EU’s options in the event of global trade war, featuring Bruegel director Guntram Wolff with Bernd Lange, member of the European Parliament and chair of the Committee on International Trade.

Tamotsu Nakamura and Maria Åsenius participated in one session of the Bruegel conference on international trade and the EU-Japan agreement.

View comments
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Opinion

China’s view of the trade war has changed—and so has its strategy

The truce agreed on by China and the United States at the sidelines of the recent G-20 meeting in Buenos Aires doesn’t really change the picture of the U.S.’s ultimate goal of containing China. The reason is straightforward: The U.S. and China have become strategic competitors and will continue to be so for the foreseeable future, which leaves little room for any long-term settlement of disputes.

By: Alicia García-Herrero Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: December 19, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

Brexit: Now for something completely different?

The life of Brexit. After a week of ECJ rulings, delayed votes, Theresa May’s errands across Europe and the vote of no confidence, we review the latest economists’ opinions to try to make sense of what has changed and what hasn’t.

By: Inês Goncalves Raposo Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: December 17, 2018
Read article Download PDF More on this topic More by this author

Policy Contribution

Forecast errors and monetary policy normalisation in the euro area

What did we learn from the recent monetary policy normalisation experiences of Sweden, the United States and the United Kingdom? Zsolt Darvas consider the lessons and analyse the European Central Bank’s forecasting track record and possible factors that might explain the forecast errors.

By: Zsolt Darvas Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: December 13, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

Deep Focus: Consequences of European Central Bank forecasting errors

Bruegel senior scholar Zsolt Darvas speaks about his review of systematic errors in ECB forecasting, in another instalment of the Deep Focus podcast on 'The Sound of Economics' channel

By: The Sound of Economics Date: December 12, 2018
Read article More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

Deep Focus: Balancing distributional inequalities of climate policies

Bruegel fellow Georg Zachmann talks through a Bruegel Blueprint he has co-authored, looking into the potential distributional effects of climate policies, in another episode of the Deep Focus series.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Energy & Climate Date: December 7, 2018
Read article More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

Backstage: Transitioning towards sustainable finance

In this episode of the Backstage series, Bruegel's Non-Resident Fellow Dirk Schoenmaker welcomes Molly Scott Cato, a Green party MEP for South West England, for a conversation on the EU's plan to transition towards sustainable finance.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Energy & Climate, Finance & Financial Regulation Date: November 30, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

Backstage: Shared prosperity for the EU and north Africa

Bruegel's director Guntram Wolff looks at north Africa's economic growth in the light of the region's trade agreements with the EU, welcoming Karim El Aynaoui and Uri Dadush to the Backstage series on 'The Sound of Economics'.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: November 27, 2018
Read article Download PDF More on this topic

Policy Contribution

Assessing the European Union’s North Africa trade agreements

In this Policy Contribution, the authors provide an economic assessment of the trade agreements between the EU and North Africa. They argue that the common view of the agreements is overly negative, and point to policy conclusions that could increase regional integration.

By: Uri Dadush and Yana Myachenkova Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: November 26, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

Deep Focus: The G20 in a changing world order

In this episode of Deep Focus, Bruegel fellow Suman Bery joins Sean Gibson to elaborate on his recent Policy Contribution on the G20's performance over the past decade, and the forum's future prospects.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: November 20, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

Director’s cut: What Syrian refugees need to return home

This episode of the Director’s Cut features a conversation between Bruegel’s director, Guntram Wolff and Maha Yahya, the director of the Carnegie Middle East Center

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: November 15, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

Is this time different? Reflections on recent emerging-market turbulence

Since the beginning of 2018, currencies of two large emerging-market economies – Argentina and Turkey – suffered from substantial depreciation. Other currencies also recorded losses. Which factors are determining macroeconomic and financial stability in emerging-market economies? And what can be done to prevent a crisis and avoid its economic, social and political costs?

By: Marek Dabrowski Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: November 14, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

US mid-term elections and the global economy

Democrats won control of the House and Republicans held onto the Senate in the most consequential US mid-term elections in decades. Bowen Call reviews economists’ and scholars’ analyses of the impact this might have on the world economy.

By: Bowen Call Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: November 12, 2018
Load more posts