External authors

Agnès Bénassy-Quéré

Chair, French Council of economic analysis

Agnès Bénassy-Quéré is a Professor at Paris School of Economics, University of Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne, and the Chair person of the French Council of economic analysis. She is also a Member of the Commission Economique de la Nation (an advisory body to the Finance minister), the French macro-prudential authority, the Cercle des Economistes, and is affiliated with CESIfo.

She holds a PhD in economics from University Paris-Dauphine. She then worked for the French Ministry of economy and finance, before moving to academic positions successively at Universities of Cergy-Pontoise, Lille 2, Paris-Ouest and Ecole Polytechnique. She also served as a Deputy-director and as a Director of CEPII, the French research center in international economics, as a columnist at France Culture and as a member of the Shadow ECB Council. Her research interests focus on the international monetary system and European macroeconomic policy.

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Upcoming Event

Sep
7-8
09:00

Bruegel Annual Meetings 2017

The Annual Meetings are Bruegel’s flagship event. They offer a mixture of large public debates and small private sessions about key issues in European and global economics. In a series of high-level discussions, Bruegel’s scholars, members and stakeholders will address the economic policy challenges facing Europe.

Speakers: José Antonio Álvarez Álvarez, Agnès Bénassy-Quéré, Pervenche Béres, Jean Luc Demarty, Anna Ekström, Lowri Evans, Sandro Gozi, Peter Grünenfelder, Patrick Graichen, Reiner Hoffman, Levin Holle, Steffen Kampeter, Peter Kažimír, Emmanuel Lagarrigue, Steven Maijoor, Nathalie Moll, James Murray, Carlos Sallé Alonso, André Sapir, Dirk Schoenmaker, Mateusz Szczurek, Marianne Thyssen, Liviu Voinea, Johan Van Overtveldt, James Waterworth, Ida Wolden Bache and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: Energy & Climate, European Macroeconomics & Governance, Finance & Financial Regulation, Global Economics & Governance, Innovation & Competition Policy Location: Square - Brussels Meeting Centre
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Policy Contribution

Making the best of the European single market

Now more than ever, the EU needs to address concerns about the significant decline in productivity growth and the increasing perception of unfairness. Completing the single market would unlock the EU's growth potential. At the same time, the EU should empower member states to fight inequality by helping them better distribute the gains arising from economic integration.

By: Vincent Aussilloux, Agnès Bénassy-Quéré, Clemens Fuest and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 2, 2017
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Opinion

ECB decisions put lack of fiscal union in the spotlight

Fiscal policy in the euro area is hardly supporting the recovery and the ECB. The EU needs a a proper fiscal union in order to stabilise the economy and inflation. We see four main avenues for achieving a viable fiscal framework.

By: Agnès Bénassy-Quéré and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: March 30, 2016
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Policy Contribution

Which fiscal union for the euro area?

At the current level of political and societal integration, a large federal budget is unrealistic in the euro area. The authors make three recommendations that would lead national fiscal policies to be more stabilising with respect to the economic cycle, while achieving long-term sustainability. They also recommend a move towards a European unemployment insurance scheme targeted at ‘large’ shocks, and a minimum set of labour-market harmonisation criteria.

By: Agnès Bénassy-Quéré, Xavier Ragot and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 18, 2016
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Opinion

France and Germany: a moment of truth

France and Germany, which together account for half of euro-area GDP, are rightly considered the key to the euro area’s exit from the current impasse of low growth, falling inflation and increasingly dangerous debt trajectories. But more importantly, the German-French couple is a clear example of the need for a coordinated strategy.

By: Agnès Bénassy-Quéré and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: November 25, 2014
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External Publication

Tax harmonization in Europe: Moving forward

The debate on tax competition opposes those who praise its positive effect on government efficiency, and those who accuse it of distorting public choices, inducing inequality but also undermining the functioning of markets. These two polar versions coexist in the European Union.

By: Agnès Bénassy-Quéré, Alain Trannoy and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 16, 2014
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External Publication

Don’t let the euro-area crisis go east

The European Union is committed to strengthening its partnership with China, as demonstrated by the fourteenth EU-China summit, to take place in Beijing on 14 February 2012. The EU will be represented by Herman Van Rompuy, President of the European Council, and by José Manuel Barroso, President of the European Commission. The People's Republic of China will be represented by Prime Minister Wen Jiabao. EU Trade Commissioner Karel De Gucht will also attend. On Thursday 2 February Chinese premier Wen Jiabao signalled intention to move towards helping the euro area extricate from its trouble and declared that China was “investigating and evaluating concrete ways in which it can, via the IMF, get more deeply involved in the European debt problem”. Why is China, and more generally Asia, taking this stance? A new paper by Jean Pisani-Ferry together with European and Asian colleagues from the Asia-Europe Economic Forum (AEEF) discusses the implications of the euro crisis for Asia, reasons for Asia-Europe cooperation in solving it, and obstacles on the way to this cooperation.

By: Agnès Bénassy-Quéré, He Fan, Masahiro Kawai, Tae Joon Kim, Yung Chul Park, Jean Pisani-Ferry, David Vines and Yongding Yu Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: February 3, 2012
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Blog Post

Exchange rates and global rebalancing

Since the beginning of the fall, the Framework for Strong, Sustainable and Balanced Growth launched at the G20 meeting of Pittsburgh one year ago seems to have degenerated into a “currency war” whereby each country would like to enjoy a weak currency. The logic of the Pittsburgh framework was to engineer a rebalancing of world […]

By: Agnès Bénassy-Quéré Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: November 5, 2011
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Blueprint

Global currencies for tomorrow: a European perspective

This report examines how the international monetary system (IMS) might evolve and the implications of different scenarios for the euro area over the next fifteen years. After the collapse of the Bretton Woods system forty years ago, the IMS gradually developed into its present state, a hybrid mix of exchange-rate flexibility, capital mobility and monetary […]

By: Ignazio Angeloni, Agnès Bénassy-Quéré, Benjamin Carton, Christophe Destais, Zsolt Darvas, Jean Pisani-Ferry, André Sapir and Shahin Vallée Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: July 22, 2011
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Working Paper

What international monetary system for a fast-changing world economy

Though the renminbi is not yet convertible, the international monetary regime has already started to move towards a ‘multipolar’ system, with the dollar, the euro and the renminbi as its key likely pillars. This shift corresponds to the long-term evolution of the balance of economic weight in the world economy. Such an evolution may mitigate […]

By: Agnès Bénassy-Quéré and Jean Pisani-Ferry Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: April 1, 2011
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Policy Contribution

Reform of the international monetary system: Some concrete steps

Reform of the international monetary system is under discussion after three decades of apathy. Tectonic shifts in the balance of international power have made reform more urgent. However, in the short term, there is little chance of a grand redesign of the international monetary system. Nevertheless, concrete steps should be taken. First, consensus is needed […]

By: Jean Pisani-Ferry, Yongding Yu and Agnès Bénassy-Quéré Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: March 28, 2011
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