Scholars

Alessio Terzi

Affiliate Fellow

Expertise: Structural reforms, EU Single Market, european goverance Twitter: @Terzibus

Alessio Terzi, an Italian citizen, joined Bruegel in October 2013. Prior to this, Alessio was a Research Analyst in the EMU governance division of the European Central Bank. He has also worked for the macroeconomic forecasting unit of DG ECFIN (European Commission), the Scottish Parliament’s Financial Scrutiny Unit, and BMI Research (Fitch group), a country risk and forecasting firm in the City of London, where he was a Europe Analyst.

He holds a Bachelor's degree in International Economics from Bocconi University and an MPA in European Economic Policy from the London School of Economics, where he specialised in public economics. During his studies, he spent a semester at Dartmouth College (USA). Alessio’s main research interests include structural reforms, competitiveness, EMU governance, and the G20.

Alessio is currently a Visiting Fulbright Fellow at the Kennedy School of Government of Harvard University. He is also pursuing a PhD in Political Economy at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin, working under the supervision of prof. Henrik Enderlein and Jean Pisani-Ferry.

He is fluent in Italian and English, has a good knowledge of French, and an intermediate level of German and Spanish.

Declaration of interests 2015

Declaration of interests 2016

Contact information

alessio.terzi@bruegel.org

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External Publication

Review of EU-third country cooperation on policies falling within the ITRE domain in relation to Brexit

What is the possible future relationship between the EU and the UK in light of Brexit? The report provides a critical assessment of the implications of existing models of cooperation between third countries and the European Union on energy, electronic communications, research policy and small business policy.

By: J. Scott Marcus, Georgios Petropoulos, André Sapir, Simone Tagliapietra, Alessio Terzi, Reinhilde Veugelers and Georg Zachmann Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 5, 2017
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Blog Post

The Trump market rally conundrum

What’s at stake: Since Donald Trump’s election in November, the US stock market has been on an unabated rally. The Dow Jones Industrial Average powered through the 20,000 mark for the first time in history. POTUS has been quick in using this financial bonanza as prima facie evidence of his early accomplishments. However, several commentators question the link between Trump’s unorthodox economic policy pledges, the stock market rally, and future growth prospects.

By: Alessio Terzi Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation, Global Economics & Governance Date: February 27, 2017
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Blog Post

Renzi is going all in on the Constitutional referendum: what are the (updated) odds?

Italians are being called to the ballot boxes on 4 December to either confirm or reject Constitutional amendments put forward by the government. Alessio Terzi constructed a probabilistic model based on poll data to assess the likelihood of such an event.

By: Alessio Terzi Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: November 17, 2016
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Opinion

The G20 in a post-Brexit world

As Britain enters a period of political and economic instability, following a referendum vote that many now interpret as anti-globalisation, it is worth reflecting on what the consequences of Brexit will be for the world’s ‘economic steering committee’: the G20.

By: Alessio Terzi Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: August 18, 2016
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Blog Post

How to make the single market more inclusive after Brexit

The creation of the single market generated winners and losers. Yet redistribution remains first and foremost a competence of national governments. It is thus fair to state that a failure in national, more than European, policies and welfare systems can be partly blamed for current discontent with the EU and the single market.

By: Alessio Terzi Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: August 18, 2016
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Policy Contribution

An Italian job: the need for collective wage bargaining reform

Italy’s current system of centralised wage bargaining needs to be reformed. The system was designed without regard for the underlying industrial structure and geographical heterogeneity of the Italian economy. This has fostered perverse incentives and imbalances within Italy.

By: Alessio Terzi Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 6, 2016
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Blog Post

A vade mecum for Italy’s G7 presidency

Following Germany this year and Japan in 2016, Italy will assume the rotating presidency of the G7 in 2017. However, even the global governance aficionados could wonder whether this matters at all.

By: Alessio Terzi and Matteo Villa Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: December 16, 2015
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Parliamentary Testimony

Italian Parliament

Global economic governance: Italy's role in the G7 and G20

This paper was produced for the Italian Parliament and Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

By: Alessio Terzi and Matteo Villa Topic: Italian Parliament, Testimonies Date: December 16, 2015
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Opinion

Could Europe’s next growth locomotive be Made in Italy?

Important reforms put in place over the past months, combined with a conjunction of particularly supportive external factors, mean that Italy could indeed become the fastest growing large economy in the euro area in a not-too-distant future.

By: Alessio Terzi Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: October 27, 2015
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Blog Post

No coordination without representation

Further democratic legitimacy is a pre-requisite to economic union. This article explores how economic policies in the euro area should be coordinated, but this cannot be done in a mechanical rules-based manner. Arguing the contrary suggests a cavalier understanding of the complexity of economic policymaking.

By: Alessio Terzi Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: October 8, 2015
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