Former scholars

Allison Mandra

Former Research Intern

Allison Mandra is from the United States. She was an intern at Bruegel from November 2014 until June 2015. She obtained her Master’s in Macroeconomic Policy and Financial Markets from the Barcelona Graduate School of Economics, where she wrote a thesis on whether financial analysts’ price targets for public equities are concordant with the use of rational expectations in asset-pricing models.

She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Bates College in the United States, and wrote her undergraduate thesis on the instabilities and inequities of the current international reserve system, including an analysis of proposed avenues for reform. During her studies she also spent a semester at Cambridge University focusing on theories of industrial organization.

Allison’s research interests include macroeconomics and international financial stability.

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Blog Post

Measuring Political Muscle in European Union Institutions

In this blog post we measure the number of top posts held by each nationality in the European Commission, the European Council and the European Parliament. 

By: Allison Mandra Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: April 12, 2015
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Blog Post

ECB Quantitative Easing on track

On 9 March 2015 the ECB began purchasing European sovereign and agency bonds and supranational debt securities under the Public Sector Purchase Programme (PSPP). Today, the ECB published its PSPP holdings and the corresponding weighted average remaining maturities for each member state and the supranational institutions after the first month of purchases. 

By: Grégory Claeys, Alvaro Leandro and Allison Mandra Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: April 8, 2015
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Blog Post

German wage negotiations

In the beginning of January I wrote about the impact of persistently low inflation on collectively bargained wages in Germany. Concluded negotiations in the banking, construction, printing, and federal state and municipalities sectors at the time pointed to lower wage increases in 2015 than in 2014, as did suggestions from employers’ associations that stagnating productivity and a low inflation environment would factor into the negotiation process. 

By: Allison Mandra Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: March 17, 2015
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Policy Contribution

European Central Bank quantitative easing: the detailed manual

This Policy Contribution examines the detail of how quantitative easing will actually take place in the euro area and its implications, following the European Central Bank's announcement in January 2015 of a massive expansion of its asset purchase programme. 

By: Grégory Claeys, Alvaro Leandro and Allison Mandra Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: March 11, 2015
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Blog Post

Is low inflation translating into lower wage growth in Germany already?

Low inflation in Germany is a big concern not just because of its importance for the euro area aggregate but also because it makes relative price adjustment for the euro area periphery harder. This blog post looks at recent wage growth in Germany and scheduled pay increases determined through collective bargaining agreements for 2015.

By: Allison Mandra Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 8, 2015