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Andreas Wiedemann

Andreas Wiedemann is a Ph.D. student in Political Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he studies comparative and international political economy with a focus on advanced democracies. He holds an M.Sc. in International Political Economy from the London School of Economics (LSE) and a B.A. in Governance and Public Policy from the University of Passau, Germany, and has previously worked for the Boston Consulting Group and the European Commission’s DG ECFIN.

Andreas’ main research interests include the political economy of financial markets and economic crises, international macroeconomics, and distributional conflicts under capitalism.

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Blog Post

A press review ahead of the German Constitutional Court decision

On 11 and 12 June, 2013 the German Federal Constitutional Court (FCC) will consider the legality and conformability of the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) and the ECB’s Outright Monetary Transaction programme (OMT) in particular. In this press review, we summarize the key issues.

By: Andreas Wiedemann Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: October 15, 2014
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Overview of the Karlsruhe Hearing on OMT – Summary

It is noteworthy that the Court asked several times throughout the hearing about the possibility to change the ECB’s mandate – not least because the core of the debate appeared to be the compatibility of the OMT program with the ECB’s monetary policy mandate.

By: Andreas Wiedemann Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: June 13, 2013
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Overview of the Karlsruhe Hearing on OMT – Day 1

The German Federal Constitutional Court (FCC) has begun to hear the case against the ECB’s OMT program. The two day-long hearing is unusually long and signifies the importance of the subject matter. According to the FAZ, this is one of the most important cases in history.

By: Andreas Wiedemann Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: June 13, 2013