Non resident scholars

Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol

Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol

Non-resident fellow

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Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol, a French citizen, was a Visiting Fellow at Bruegel in 2015 and he is now a non resident scholar. He is Lord Kelvin Adam Smith Fellow in the Adam Smith Business School, University of Glasgow. Prior to this, he was Pinto Post-Doctoral Fellow at LSE IDEAS, the London School of Economics’ centre for the study of international affairs. He is also Visiting Professor at the Université Libre de Bruxelles.

Emmanuel’s research ranges across a variety of topics in European and international economic relations, including European monetary integration, the development of Western European financial regulation in the 1960s-1980s, and the rise of the European Council. He is the author of A Europe Made of Money: the Emergence of the European Monetary System (Cornell UP, 2012) and has edited International Summitry and Global Governance: the Rise of the G7 and the European Council (Routledge, 2014, with Federico Romero). His publications appear in journals such as West European Politics, Business History, Cold War History and Diplomacy & Statecraft.

He holds a PhD from the European University Institute in Florence, an MSc from the London School of Economics and is a graduate from the Institut d’Études Politiques in Strasbourg. He speaks English, French, German and Italian. You can find more information on his personal website.

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Blog Post

Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol

The EU must stand ready to confront US leadership

This is not the first time that the United States has antagonised Europe. And Europe can provide an effective response to such external challenges when it stands united.

By: Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: February 3, 2017
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Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol

UK political elite used poverty & immigration fears to secure leave vote

The bulk of UK Leave voters come from disadvantaged areas, and perceive immigration as a threat. But significant exceptions to this trend in England and most importantly in Scotland make it hard to draw a simple causal link between wealth, immigration, and voting patterns.

By: Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: June 29, 2016
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Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol

Brexit debate ignores UK's privileged position in Europe

The UK enjoys opt-outs from many EU policies, without its influence in the EU being diminished. But the UK’s privileged position in the EU has been neglected in the referendum debate, which has been caught up in statistics about the material costs and benefits of the EU.

By: Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: May 31, 2016
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Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol

Will a UK welfare reform ease the UK's EU negotiation?

In a speech on 22 June 2015, UK David Cameron pointed at a number of possible changes that could be made to the UK's tax credit system. Why is the UK government suddenly thinking of reforming their tax system? One reason is that the UK government’s official aim of cutting public spending. Also, the Conservative Party wants to negotiate new rules with the EU, so that people will have to be earning for a set number of years before they can claim benefits, including the tax credits that top up low wages.

By: Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: June 23, 2015
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Policy Contribution

The UK’s EU vote: the 1975 precedent and today’s negotiations

The UK’s EU vote: the 1975 precedent and today’s negotiations

As the United Kingdom will hold a referendum before the end of 2017 on its continued EU membership, Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol draws lessons from the first UK referendum of 1975 on the EU.

By: Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: June 21, 2015
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Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol

European leaders want the UK to stay, but are best friends forever?

The Conservative Party’s election victory leaves little doubt as to the holding of a referendum on continued British EU membership in 2016 or 2017. While the official content of British demands remains vague at the moment, the reaction of Britain’s partners to the prospect of negotiations is made public every day.

By: Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: May 26, 2015