Research assistants & interns

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Enrico Nano

Research Assistant

Enrico, an Italian citizen, works at Bruegel as a Research Assistant in the area of innovation and competition policy, with a focus on energy and climate. Prior to joining Bruegel, Enrico worked at the European Commission as a Blue Book trainee at DG Connect and as a business analyst intern at UniCredit Bank in Moscow.

He holds a MSc and a BSc in Economics from the University of Turin and a MA in Economics from the Collegio Carlo Alberto, where he completed the Allievi Honors Program. His master thesis in Health Economics focused on the socioeconomic determinants of health outcomes, with an empirical application to cognitive recovery after traumatic brain injuries.

Enrico’s research interests include empirical microeconomics, innovation and industrial policy, health and development economics.

He is fluent in Italian and English, and has a basic knowledge of Spanish and French.

Contact information

enrico.nano@bruegel.org

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Blog Post

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Simone Tagliapietra

Brexit goes nuclear: The consequences of leaving Euratom

The UK Government has confirmed that it will withdraw from Euratom. But what does Euratom actually do? And what will happen when the UK leaves? The authors find major risks, potential costs and open questions.

By: Enrico Nano and Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate Date: February 21, 2017
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Blog Post

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The impact of Brexit on UK tertiary education and R&D

In this blog post, we look at the impact of Brexit on UK’s education and research and development sectors in terms of students and staff, as well as funding.

By: Maria Demertzis and Enrico Nano Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 14, 2017
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Blog Post

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Simone Tagliapietra

OPEC's revival or swan song? First evidence from financial markets

On Wednesday, 30 November 2016, OPEC reached a milestone agreement to cut oil production by 1.2 million barrels a day in a long-awaited attempt to end the savage two-year downturn in prices that has shredded the budgets of its members. The deal will come into effect in January 2017 and it will mark a U-turn from the pump-at-will policy adopted by the group in November 2014.

By: Enrico Nano and Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate Date: December 2, 2016