Non resident scholars

Henrik Horn

Non Resident Fellow

Expertise: Economic aspects of trade law and competition law. CV: Download CV

Henrik Horn is a Non-Resident Senior Fellow of Bruegel since October 2006. His research is mainly focused on economic aspects of trade law and competition law, and he is responsible for Bruegel's research on regional trade agreements.

He is a Senior Research Fellow at the Research Institute of Industrial Economics, Stockholm, and Chief Reporter for an American Law Institute project on the Principles of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Agreement. Previously, he held positions as Professor of International Economics at Stockholm University, as a judge in the Swedish supreme court for competition law cases, and worked for four years at the Economic Research and Analysis Division of the WTO.

 

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Blog Post

Discussion: Can border carbon taxes fit into the global trade regime?

Reinhard Quick – Director Brussels Office of the German Chemical Industry Association, as well as a well-known trade specialist in Brussels and Honorary Professor for international economic law, Saarland University – discusses the policy brief “Can border carbon taxes fit into the global trade regime?” authored by Henrik Horn, Non-Resident Scholar at Bruegel, and André Sapir, Senior Fellow at Bruegel.

By: Henrik Horn and André Sapir Topic: Energy & Climate Date: April 4, 2014
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Policy Brief

Can border carbon taxes fit into the global trade regime?

This Policy Brief highlights some weaknesses in the standard argumentation for BCAs. But there is an alternative argument for border carbon measures, based on the fact that countries expose each other to climate externalities.

By: Henrik Horn and André Sapir Topic: Energy & Climate, Innovation & Competition Policy Date: December 9, 2013
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Blueprint

Beyond the WTO? An anatomy of EU and US preferential trade agreements

This Blueprint looks in detail at all the provisions of all the PTAs signed by the EC or the US and other WTO members. Henrik Horn, Petros C. Mavroidis and André Sapir find that Europe and the US have adopted different approaches to PTAs; however, both powers may also be seeking to project their priorities.

By: Henrik Horn, Petros C. Mavroidis and André Sapir Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 9, 2009