Former scholars

Jaume Martí Romero

Former Research Intern

Twitter: @jaume_romero

Jaume Marti worked as a Research Intern at Bruegel in 2016 in the area of European and Global Macroeconomics and Governance. He holds a Master’s Degree in Finance from the Barcelona Graduate School of Economics. His Master Thesis consisted of a theoretical model about the negative externalities in the banking system.

Before joining Bruegel, he had a brief working experience at Deloitte in their Risk Department.

Jaume’s intellectual interests include macroeconomics, education, game theory, and philosophy.

He speaks Catalan, Spanish, and English

Contact information

jaume.martiromero@bruegel.org

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Blog Post

Spanish unemployment and the effects of the 2012 labour market reform

What’s at stake: Spain is currently the EU country with the second highest level of unemployment, after Greece. The high and persistent level of unemployment and the appropriate labour market reforms are a major topic of discussion in Spain. We review arguments made in the blogosphere and by international organisations on the reasons for Spain’s stubbornly high unemployment, and various assessments of the labour market reforms of 2012.

By: Alvaro Leandro and Jaume Martí Romero Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 4, 2016
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Blog Post

Northern Ireland and EU funds

EU funding for the UK has risen considerably since 2000, but funding predominantly goes to rural and less developed areas, meaning that Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales receive more funding relative to their GDP than England.

By: Pia Hüttl and Jaume Martí Romero Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: May 3, 2016
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Blog Post

Are regional governments causing deficit overshooting in Spain?

Spain once again missed its deficit target in 2015 and it seems unlikely that 2016 will be any better. The central government has pointed to regional deficits as being the cause of the fiscal slippage. However, regional governments claim that their deficit is due to under-financing and overly strict deficit targets.

By: Jaume Martí Romero Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: April 19, 2016
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Blog Post

The remarkable case of Spanish immigration

During the first decade of the twenty-first century, Spain experienced one of the largest waves of migration in European history, relative to its population. Shortly after signing the Treaty of Adherence to join the European Community in 1985, Spain went from being a sender to a receiver country.

By: Jaume Martí Romero Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: December 8, 2015