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Nicola Viegi

South African Reserve Bank Professor of Monetary Economics, School of Economics University of Pretoria

He is the South African Reserve Bank Professor of Monetary Economics - University of Pretoria, SA since 2010. He has served in various universities like University of Strathclyde as Research Fellow, University of Strathclyde as Lecturer in Economics, University of Kwazulu-Natal as Senior Lecturer in Economics and University of Cape Town as Associate Professor in Economics. He has been Visiting Lecturer in ESC Toulouse, Lecturer in Business Economics (1999-2002), University of Malta, Lecturer in International Finance (1999-2002) and De Nederlandesche Bank, Amsterdam (2000-present).

His research areas are Monetary economics, economic policy theory, monetary fiscal policy interdependence, political economy of monetary institutions, economic policy under uncertainty assets prices and monetary policy, regional integration in Africa, political economy of government debt, the economics of colonisation and decolonisation, macromodelling for emerging countries, economic growth and institutions.

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Blog Post

Why a good Brexit outcome matters (and it’s not just the economy, stupid!)

Uncertainty still reigns over the future shape of the EU-UK relationship, as Brexit negotiations rumble on. Though the two parties are parting ways, a more cooperative approach from both would greatly improve the longer-term economic and political prospects for all concerned

By: Maria Demertzis and Nicola Viegi Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 22, 2018
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Blog Post

Are central bank(er)s still credible?

Both the Fed and the ECB have managed to remain credible since the financial crisis, but their credibility levels have evolved differently. Since inflation in the US and the euro area has been similar in the past 8 years, the difference in the way that credibility has evolved is the result of the different macroeconomic policy mix applied.

By: Maria Demertzis and Nicola Viegi Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: June 14, 2016