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Philine Schuseil

Philine, a German citizen, worked as a research intern with Bruegel in 2012. She holds a BSc in Economics from the Humboldt-University of Berlin and spent a year at the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan. In 2014, she graduated from the Toulouse School of Economics with an MSc in Economics of Markets and Organisations.

She also worked as trainee at the OECD, as assistant in a French-German real estate company and as an intern at the French Ministry of Economics and Finance.

She is fluent in English, French, and German.

Contact information

philine.schuseil@gmail.com

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A review on Germany’s minimum wage debate

Unlike many other EU countries, Germany does not have a national minimum wage even though specific industrial sectors have one.  The upper chamber of parliament, the Bundesrat, has now proposed a minimum wage of 8.5€. The debate over introducing a general minimum wage has therefore emerged and we want to summarize this debate, in particular German media voices, positions of German political parties as well as statements of economists.  

By: Philine Schuseil Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: August 25, 2014
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Minimum wage and pension reform in Germany: A headwind for growth?

Key components of the coalition agreement between Merkel’s CDU and the Social Democrats are the adoption of a nationwide minimum wage and the introduction of new pension benefits, in particular early retirement at 63. The introduction of the minimum wage follows a heated debate which gained importance ahead of coalition talks last September. The grand coalition is now governing since December and the two legislative projects advance quickly.

By: Philine Schuseil Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: April 16, 2014
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Reactions on the German Coalition Treaty

More than two months after the Federal elections, Merkel’s CDU came to an agreement to form a coalition government with the Social Democrats (SPD). A debate about the coalition treaty has emerged as some issues remain controversial such as the introduction of a nationwide minimum wage, new benefits in pension policy, new excess spending and measures addressing the challenge of the German energy turnaround.

By: Philine Schuseil Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 8, 2014
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Follow-up: The German minimum wage debate

Since our last blog post on the German minimum wage debate, there is now renewed interest in the topic. What are the prospects of introducing a nationwide minimum wage, given the Federal elections results? 

By: Philine Schuseil Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: September 30, 2013
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The Cyprus bailout controversy in German media and politics

We want to summarize reactions among politicians and German press views. The Eurogroup set up the details of a EUR 10 billion bailout package for Cyprus on Saturday, 16 March. This programme was heavily criticized in Germany, especially due to the tax on deposits below EUR 100 000. Yet, the Cypriot Parliament voted against this measure on Tuesday which is widely perceived as blackmail in Germany. Most commentators insists that Cyprus needs to come up with the agreed EUR 6 billion in order to receive the remaining sum from its European partners.

By: Philine Schuseil Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: March 22, 2013
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German views on aid for Cyprus

After the Cyprus’s application for EU aid in June 2012, the negotiations on the programme are now getting concrete. The discussion in Germany about possible aid that is estimated between EUR 12 and 17.5 billion for the period 2013-2016 is focusing on the Cypriot financial sector which doesn’t enjoy a good reputation. In the German media, Cyprus and its banks are widely seen –rightly or wrongly - as a tax haven and a money-laundering base.

By: Philine Schuseil Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 16, 2013
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Is Germany heading towards a referendum?

The question of the compatibility of the German constitution (officially known as the Basic Law), with further European integration is at the origin of current debates in Germany.  The Federal Constitutional Court (FCC) will decide in September on whether the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) exceeds the limits of the Basic Law. Meanwhile, a debate on holding a referendum in Germany on the future of the EU and new EU treaties emerges. This column summarizes the discussion.

By: Philine Schuseil Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: October 10, 2012
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The countdown for the ESM: press views on Karlsruhe

On Wednesday 12 September, Germany’s Federal Constitutional Court (FCC) will announce its decision on the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) as well as on the Fiscal Pact. Immediately after the decision Chancellor Angela Merkel will react in the German Bundestag with a government declaration to the FCC’s decision. The decision is eagerly anticipated by German and EU politicians as well as of both German and international press and we review the German press here.

By: Philine Schuseil Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: September 11, 2012
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Views on Grexit: a summary of German media

According to the Spiegel on 22 July  the IMF signalled to EU leaders that it would not participate in further support for Greece. Countries like the Netherlands and Finland have made the involvement of the IMF a prerequisite for their aid. This review looks at recent voices in Germany on the so-called Grexit, which appears […]

By: Philine Schuseil Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 24, 2012
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The German Industry and the euro

There seems to be a division among the representatives of the German industry. While representatives of German family businesses (Familienunternehmen) claim for more regulatory rules and less integration for the eurozone, representatives of the DAX (Deutscher Aktien IndeX) and in particular the Federation of German industry (BDI) generally regrouping export-orientated enterprises defend the common currency and more integration. Nevertheless, claims from the Familienunternehmen are not backed by official statistics on exports activities.

By: Philine Schuseil Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Innovation & Competition Policy Date: July 5, 2012
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Germany: What about Eurobonds?

While the Federal Government is opposed to the idea of  Eurobonds, the German Council of Economic Experts recommends the establishment of a European Redemption Pact, under which a country could refinance itself through the European Redemption Fund (ERF) up to the point where the debt refinanced reached the current difference between the debt outstanding and […]

By: Philine Schuseil Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: May 31, 2012
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Germany: what are the implications of the NRW elections?

The recent elections in North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) on 13 May 2012 led to success for the German Social Democratic Party (SPD) and to a defeat for Merkel’s Christian Democrats (CDU). The CDU obtained a mere 26.3 % of the votes, the party’s worst ever result in this state. There is now a clear majority for […]

By: Philine Schuseil Date: May 22, 2012
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