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Pia Hüttl
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Why euro-zone ‘outs’ should join banking union

Joining the banking union could provide a stable arrangement for managing financial stability for the UK and other non-Euro countries.

By: Pia Hüttl and Dirk Schoenmaker Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 11, 2016
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Portraits Bruegel staff 2014

Can mass migration boost innovation and productivity?

The long-term impact of migration on innovation and productivity growth in host countries is a neglected issue in the current debate on refugees. Research shows that these effects can be substantial, but if Europe wants to capitalize on this potential it will need better information systems to match migrants’ skill sets with host environments.

By: Nuria Boot and Reinhilde Veugelers Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Innovation & Competition Policy Date: February 10, 2016
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Simone Tagliapietra

Iran faces a bumpy road back to global energy markets

Iran’s energy sector is vital for the country’s economy. Now that sanctions have been lifted, the government must reform the oil sector to encourage investment from international oil companies.

By: Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate Date: February 9, 2016
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Speech by Miguel Arias Cañete on EU’s climate and energy policies after COP21

Speech held at Bruegel event on "How will the Paris agreement impact EU climate and energy policies?", on 8 February 2016.

By: Miguel Arias Cañete Topic: Energy & Climate Date: February 8, 2016
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Pia Hüttl
Schoenmaker pic

European banking union: should the 'outs' join in?

To address coordination failures between national institutions regulating banks, we need supranational policies. Banking union encourages further integration of banks across borders, deepening the single market, and could also benefit countries outside the euro which have a high degree of cross-border banking.

By: Pia Hüttl and Dirk Schoenmaker Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 4, 2016

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Countries outside the eurozone could profit from joining #BankingUnion | Find out why at https://t.co/2usVDQCRbR https://t.co/PMUvuzoQVH

6 hours ago

Public spending on #migrants could reach €14.3 billion in 2016 in Germany https://t.co/90SQtUM8QO https://t.co/1VS1EdN6yB

6 hours ago

Read @Aligarciaherrer on what is driving the drop of #Chinese foreign reserves https://t.co/dopoImmYeE https://t.co/4bsyr4t1CS

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Opinion

Simone Tagliapietra

A new way to approach Europe’s gas security, beyond the usual Russian obsession

Instead of doing everything to reduce gas supplies from key suppliers, gas supply security could more effectively be safeguarded by ensuring that unused alternatives are maintained so that they can be tapped into for in case of supply disruption.

By: Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate Date: February 3, 2016
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Opinion

Guntram B. Wolff

The economic consequences of Schengen

The president of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, recently warned that “without Schengen and the free movement of workers, of citizens, the euro makes no sense.” And in fact, it is the single currency and the ability to travel freely without identity documents that most Europeans associate with the EU. So how does it really stand with Schengen and the euro?

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 2, 2016
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Marek Dabrowski

Belarus: time to reform

Belarus must speed up its transition to a market economy, in order to return to growth and to avoid a new balance of payments crisis. But such reform will face economic, social and political challenges

By: Marek Dabrowski Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: February 1, 2016
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Jérémie Cohen-Setton

Blaming the Fed for the Great Recession

What’s at stake: Following an article in the New York Times by David Beckworth and Ramesh Ponnuru, the conversation on the blogosphere was dominated this week by the question of whether the Fed actually caused the Great Recession. While not mainstream, this narrative recently received a boost as Ted Cruz, a Republican candidate for the White House, championed it.

By: Jérémie Cohen-Setton Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 1, 2016
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Opinion

Ashoka Mody

The market's troubling message

Amid one of the worst market routs on record, a chorus of reassuring economic commentators insists that global fundamentals are sound and investors are overreacting, behaving like a panicked herd. Don’t be so sure.

By: Ashoka Mody Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: January 30, 2016
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Opinion

Guntram B. Wolff

The fallout from the European refugee crisis

Of the 1.5 million refugees that reached the European Union last year, more than 1 million ended up in Germany, but the initially welcoming atmosphere has changed drastically.

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 29, 2016
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Karen E. Wilson

Innovation and sustainability of European healthcare systems

The EU health sector represents 10% of GDP, 15% of public expenditure and 8% of the workforce, and has high potential for innovation and growth. Improvements in people's health impact productivity, labour supply, employability and workforce mobility.

By: Karen E. Wilson Date: January 28, 2016
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