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We need a broader, greener EU-Turkey energy partnership

Energy is a vital part of the EU’s increasingly strained relationship with Turkey. It’s also one of the areas where there is still a lot of potential to find positive synergies. However, the EU’s strategy is too focussed on oil and gas. We need a broader and more sustainable approach to EU-Turkey energy relations.

By: Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate Date: October 19, 2017
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Blog Post

Revision of the Posted Workers Directive misses the point

The Commission’s proposed revision of the Posted Workers Directive has been approved by the European Parliament’s Employment Committee, which welcomes the arrival of “equal pay for equal work”. But the revision will have little impact, and was largely unnecessary. Instead we should focus on the fight against bogus self-employment, social security fraud and undeclared work.

By: Zsolt Darvas Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: October 18, 2017
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An irrational choice: behavioural economist wins Nobel Prize

Richard Thaler was awarded this year's Nobel Prize in Economics for his contributions to the field of behavioural economics. His work documents a set of cognitive biases affecting economic decision-making and casts doubt on commonly-held assumptions about the rational ‘homo economicus’ that inhabits economic models and theories. What are the implications for the economics discipline and public policy?

By: Konstantinos Efstathiou Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: October 16, 2017
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Blog Post

On the cost of gun ownership

On 1 October 2017, 59 people were killed and another 489 injured in what is currently the deadliest mass shooting in US modern history. The author reviews recent contributions on the economic cost of gun violence, as well as the impact of regulation.

By: Silvia Merler Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: October 11, 2017
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Blog Post

An update: sovereign bond holdings in the euro area – the impact of quantitative easing

Since the European Central Bank’s announcement in January 2015 of its quantitative easing programme, national central banks have been buying government and national agency bonds. In this post we look at the effect of QE on sectoral holdings of government bonds, updating calculations that we published initially in May 2016.

By: Pia Hüttl and David Pichler Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: October 10, 2017

30 minutes ago

#Technology and #digitalisation have major implications for #labour markets. The impact of #Uber: https://t.co/unVltRutcZ

4 hours ago

An update: #sovereign #bond holdings in the euro area – The impact of #quantitative #easing @PIAHUETTL &Pichler… https://t.co/SMdfZljq06

8 hours ago

#China is the world’s new #science and #technology powerhouse. Op-ed by @R_Veugelers https://t.co/YELN2eeZ5K https://t.co/mSiTyNveb5

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Blog Post

India’s trade ties with the UK and EU

As EU and Indian leaders meet in Delhi, we look at the figures on trade. The UK’s place in the relationship warrants special attention. EU-India trade has more than tripled since 2000, but UK-India trade is largely static. The shift is especially noticeable for EU exports to India, where the UK share has dropped from 29% to 10%.

By: Maria Demertzis and Alexander Roth Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Global Economics & Governance Date: October 6, 2017
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Catalonia and the Spanish banking system

As tensions rise around Catalonia's independence movement, there are worries about the impact on the Spanish banking sector. Banks based in Catalonia account for around 14% of total assets. Some major institutions are already moving their headquarters to other parts of Spain. However, most Spanish banks have significant exposure to the Catalan market, and all could be caught up in the turmoil.

By: Yana Myachenkova Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: October 6, 2017
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Blog Post

Long-term growth potential, or dead in the long run?

By linking growth with both employment and the imperative for India to hold its own with China for strategic autonomy, Prime Minister Modi has brought sustainable, high quality, inclusive economic growth to the centre of political discussion, which is where it rightfully belongs.

By: Suman Bery Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: October 5, 2017
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Blog Post

What has driven the votes for Germany’s right-wing Alternative für Deutschland?

The AfD vote in East Germany was consistently stronger than in the West, even after controlling for income, age, education, religion and the overall rural nature of the new Bundesländer.

By: Alexander Roth and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: October 5, 2017
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Blog Post

Ukraine’s oligarchs are bad for democracy and economic reform

Ukraine’s late and incomplete economic reform created a class of super-wealthy oligarchs who now stand in the way of further liberalisation. The oligarchs’ oversized influence only deepens public distrust in a structurally weak political system. Nevertheless, Ukraine is making some attempts to uproot corruption and the next steps are clear.

By: Marek Dabrowski Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: October 3, 2017
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Blog Post

The Economics of Healthcare

Healthcare reform has been a thorn in the side of the US administration for several months, prompting President Trump to declare that “Nobody knew that healthcare could be so complicated.” We review recent economists’ views on the issue.

By: Silvia Merler Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: October 2, 2017
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Opinion

A Jamaican Germany is good for Europe

After a surprising election result, Europe is closely watching German coalition negotiations. A so-called Jamaica coalition of conservatives, liberals and greens is the most likely outcome, but many fear this will be bad for the EU and the Eurozone. Not so, argues Guntram Wolff. In fact, a shift to Jamaica could be good news for Europe.

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: September 29, 2017
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