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Grégory Claeys
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Amsterdam’s boom-bust housing market needs its own mortgage limits

House prices in the Netherlands are on the rise again. But at the local level the pattern is very uneven: house prices in major cities are rising faster than in the rest of the country. Yet, macroprudential policies in Europe are based on trends in national housing price indices. With such divergence between Dutch regions, is that appropriate?

By: Grégory Claeys and Dirk Schoenmaker Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 20, 2017
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MariaDemertzis1 bw
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Brexit and the UK creative industry

The creative sector is important for the UK in terms of employment and share of exports. However, it has mostly been overlooked in Brexit negotiation discussions, despite the fact that a hard Brexit could risk slowing down one of the UK's most consistently growing sectors over the last decades.

By: Maria Demertzis and Fabio Matera Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 18, 2017
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Silvia Merler

The economic effects of migration

What’s at stake: migration is currently a very hot topic in both the US and the EU. Immigration issues have come to the forefront due to the problem of rapidly ageing populations, the refugee crisis, and growing anti-immigration political rhetoric. But what do we know about the economic effects of migration?

By: Silvia Merler Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 16, 2017
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MariaDemertzis1 bw
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The Italian Lira: the exchange rate and employment in the ERM

In the decades before Italy joined the Euro, the Lira was devalued many times relative to the Deutschmark. Were these re-alignments accompanied by long term improvements on the labour market? The data suggests this was not the case.

By: Maria Demertzis, Konstantinos Efstathiou and Fabio Matera Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 13, 2017
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Marek Dabrowski

How to balance sovereignty and integration in a voluntary EU

The principle of voluntary membership is a central value of the EU project, but it is also a source of many of its problems. How can the member states address those problems in order to repair the EU's integration architecture?

By: Marek Dabrowski Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 12, 2017

21 hours ago

#US service sector jobs better paid than #manufacturing jobs, when one takes out supervisory roles… https://t.co/5QJcyGA8WA

22 hours ago

Manufacturing in the US: Will #Trump’s strategy repatriate highly-paid jobs? Read @GuntramWolff's analysis at… https://t.co/6mLQoQFhXV

1 day ago

Estonia, Greece, Poland, UK & USA = The only #NATO members above 2% target for defense spending in 2015… https://t.co/PkEh1XXdtT

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Silvia Merler

Compensating the “losers” of globalisation

What’s at stake: According to some, 2016’s political turmoil shows that the so-called “losers” of globalisation are striking back. There is, however, little agreement on how government should respond to this challenge.

By: Silvia Merler Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 9, 2017
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Guntram B. Wolff

Manufacturing in the US: Will Trump’s strategy repatriate highly-paid jobs?

Trump has set out a plan to repatriate highly-paid manufacturing jobs to the US. But the idea that manufacturing jobs are better paid than service roles is a myth. Moreover, labour markets are slow to shift between sectors. An aggressive trade policy may create some jobs in manufacturing but will not be a benefit to US citizens in general.

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: January 6, 2017
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Opinion

Nicolas Véron

Giving Asia its due in global financial regulation

With US inward turn, China should get a bigger role to bolster system

By: Nicolas Véron Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: January 5, 2017
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Opinion

Nicolas Véron

ECB finally addressing Italian bank woes

Italy’s banking problem has been left unaddressed for too long. Similar to Japan in the 1990s, it is best understood as a combination of structural and cyclical factors.

By: Nicolas Véron Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: January 4, 2017
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Opinion

Guntram B. Wolff

What will drive political uncertainty in 2017?

2017 promises to be another challenging year for Europe's liberal democracies. Many EU member states are facing elections. But it may be cultural backlash rather than economics that will drive populist vote.

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: January 3, 2017
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Silvia Merler

2016: The end

What’s at stake: 2016 is coming to an end. It will be remembered as an annus mirabilis and horribilis, at the same time. 2016 brought us some previously unthinkable political shocks, and admittedly took away some of our finest musicians. It also couldn’t help taking away Willy Wonka and Princess Leia, making this a much sadder Galaxy. This raises an obvious question: what are we in for, in 2017?

By: Silvia Merler Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: December 31, 2016
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Silvia Merler

The strange case of the MPS capital shortfall

Italy's banking saga continues with the announcement that beleaguered MPS may need to find an additional €3bn. What exactly has changed, and what does it say about ECB decision making?

By: Silvia Merler Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: December 27, 2016
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