Upcoming Event

Apr
11
12:30

Can the euro area weather the next crisis?

Is the euro area strong enough to make it through another crisis? What reforms are still needed. Klaus Regling will join us for this roundtable event in Washington DC to discuss these questions.

April 11, 2019, 12:30 pm 2055 L Street NW, Washington DC 20036 Invitation-only | On the Record Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance

On 11 April Bruegel will hold a high-level roundtable debate with Klaus Regling, Managing Director of the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) in Washington DC. In his initial remarks, Klaus Regling will answer the question if the euro area is now robust enough to weather the next crisis. Klaus Regling will describe the euro area reforms as agreed by the Euro Summit in December, and will put a focus on the strengthened role of the ESM. Bruegel’s Director, Guntram Wolff, will chair the following roundtable discussion, which will be kicked-off by Maria Demertzis, Bruegel’s deputy director.

The event will take place at the offices of the Center for Global Development and Masood Ahmed, CGD’s president, will welcome guests.

The event will be held at 12:30-14:00 at the Center for Global Development, 2055 L Street NW, Washington DC 20036, at 12:30-14:00. A sandwich lunch will be served.

This event is only open to Bruegel’s Members and a small number of selected invitees. For more information write to matilda.sevon@bruegel.org

Speakers

Masood Ahmed

President of Center for Global Development (CDG)

Klaus Regling

Managing Director of the European Stability Mechanism (ESM)

Maria Demertzis

Deputy Director

Guntram B. Wolff

Director

Location & Contact

2055 L Street NW, Washington DC 20036

Matilda Sevon

matilda.sevon@bruegel.org

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