Past Event

Designing a new institutional framework for UK-EU relations

Finding the right way forward for the EU and the UK.

Date: July 13, 2018, 12:00 pm Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance

As the UK cabinet seems to converge on a “soft Brexit” solution, it is time to revisit what a soft Brexit could look like, and what is possible under EU law. The EU has developed a number of models for cooperation with third countries that seek to remain “close” to the bloc, but all have problems. The EU is not satisfied with the lack of institutional architecture to supervise and enforce its economic agreements with Switzerland​ and smaller countries. ​The relation with ​​​​​​​Turkey​ also has a number of issues​. Meanwhile the EFTA-EEA states complain of lack influence in EU rule-making and the UK has ruled out this option, in part, for that reason.

​A possible​ partnership agreement with the UK, covering both economic and security matters, ​might be a new institutional framework​ for broader applicability​​. The UK would like it to be flexible​ but the EU wants it to be robust and based on strong legal basis with less flexibility and no cherry picking. In any case, a new EU-UK relation could ​lead to changes in the structure ​of ​the EU’s relationships with other third countries in future. In an economic context, this challenge divides into four smaller questions.

  • ​Should (and, if yes, how) can the UK and the EU have a useful input into each other’s sovereign rule-making in a way that respects the autonomy of both jurisdictions?
  • If the agreement between the UK and the EU is a “living” agreement that can develop over time, how should that development be managed and new rules incorporated into the agreement?
  • How can the UK and the EU design a surveillance and supervision regime for the agreement that protects the integrity of the single market?
  • What institutions could the UK and EU design to resolve future disputes over the agreement?

The aim of this roundtable is to explore potential future options, and to consider their merits and weaknesses outside the framework of a “negotiation”.

This is an invitation-only, off-the-record roundtable for Bruegel’s members and a select number of experts. There will be no livestream.   

Schedule

Jul 13, 2018

12:00-12:30

Check-in and lunch

12:30-12:40

Kick-off remarks

Chair: Guntram B. Wolff, Director

12:40-13:00

Presentation

Chair: Guntram B. Wolff, Director

Raphael Hogarth, Research Associate, The Institute for Government

Jill Rutter, Programme Director, The Institute for Government

13:00-14:30

Roundtable discussion

14:30

End

Speakers

Raphael Hogarth

Research Associate, The Institute for Government

Jill Rutter

Programme Director, The Institute for Government

Guntram B. Wolff

Director

Location & Contact

Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels

Katja Knezevic

katja.knezevic@bruegel.org

Read article More on this topic More by this author

Opinion

A Brexit deal is still not achieved

The UK paper should be seriously considered. While it breaks a number of European red-lines, it is also an attempt to solve some issues. The question is whether the EU will be ready to seriously negotiate. Geostrategic considerations suggest that it is time for the EU to do so.

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 13, 2018
Read article

Blog Post

Trading invisibles: Exposure of countries to GDPR

This blog post identifies provisions of the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that affect foreign companies, and discusses implications for trade in services with the EU. The authors provide a novel mapping of countries’ relative exposure to these regulations by a) measuring the digital maturity of their service exports to the EU; and b) the share of these exports in national GDP.

By: Sonali Chowdhry and Nicolas Moës Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Global Economics & Governance Date: June 28, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

Director's Cut: The drama of the EU and euro area

Bruegel's director, Guntram Wolff, is joined by Ashoka Mody, visiting professor in international economic policy at Princeton University to discuss topics from his latest book, Euro tragedy: a drama in nine acts.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: June 27, 2018
Read article More by this author

Parliamentary Testimony

European Parliament

The potential impact of Brexit on ICT policy

Testimony before the European Parliament's Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE).

By: J. Scott Marcus Topic: European Parliament, Innovation & Competition Policy, Testimonies Date: June 27, 2018
Read article Download PDF More on this topic More by this author

Working Paper

EU financial services policy since 2007: crisis, responses and prospects

This paper presents a holistic overview and assessment of the European Union (EU)’s financial services policy since the start of its financial crisis in mid-2007. Its emphasis is on public policy initiatives and developments at the European level, including those specific to the euro area.

By: Nicolas Véron Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: June 21, 2018
Read article More on this topic

Blog Post

The G7 is dead, long live the G7

The summit in Charlevoix left behind a Group of Seven in complete disarray. The authors think that the G-group, in its current formulation, no longer has a reason to exist, and it should be replaced with a more representative group of countries. In this fast-changing world, is the G7 only a relic of the past?

By: Jim O‘Neill and Alessio Terzi Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: June 13, 2018
Read about event

Past Event

Past Event

Financial services after Brexit - what path for the EU27 and the UK?

How will the European financial services industry develop after Brexit?

Speakers: Dashiell Caldwell, Richard Knox and Francesco Papadia Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Finance & Financial Regulation Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: May 30, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Opinion

La PAC n’est pas taboue

Dans cette chronique, l'auteur estime qu’une renationalisation graduelle de certaines politiques pourrait utilement contribuer à la nécessaire redéfinition du modèle agricole français..

By: Jean Pisani-Ferry Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: May 28, 2018
Read article

Parliamentary Testimony

European Parliament

Brexit and Energy Policy

Testimony before the European Parliament's Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

By: Simone Tagliapietra and Georg Zachmann Topic: Energy & Climate, European Parliament, Testimonies Date: May 28, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

The effects of Brexit on UK growth and inflation

The full consequences of Britain’s vote to leave the European Union were never going to be immediately perceptible. As we approach the second anniversary of the UK’s Brexit referendum, we can compare the subsequent economic data for the UK and the euro area and see how it diverges from the trends established before the vote.

By: Francesco Papadia Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: May 23, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Opinion

What does Europe care about? Watch where it spends

The European Union says it wants to focus on new priorities. First it will have to cut spending in sectors that have long enjoyed support.

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: May 14, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

European income inequality begins to fall once again

Following almost a decade of relative stability, income inequality within the EU recorded a sizeable decline in 2016, reaching its lowest value since 1989. The fall of both within- and between-country inequality contributed to the 2016 reduction in overall EU inequality.

By: Zsolt Darvas Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: April 30, 2018
Load more posts