Past Event

Designing a new institutional framework for UK-EU relations

Finding the right way forward for the EU and the UK.

Date: July 13, 2018, 12:00 pm Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance

As the UK cabinet seems to converge on a “soft Brexit” solution, it is time to revisit what a soft Brexit could look like, and what is possible under EU law. The EU has developed a number of models for cooperation with third countries that seek to remain “close” to the bloc, but all have problems. The EU is not satisfied with the lack of institutional architecture to supervise and enforce its economic agreements with Switzerland​ and smaller countries. ​The relation with ​​​​​​​Turkey​ also has a number of issues​. Meanwhile the EFTA-EEA states complain of lack influence in EU rule-making and the UK has ruled out this option, in part, for that reason.

​A possible​ partnership agreement with the UK, covering both economic and security matters, ​might be a new institutional framework​ for broader applicability​​. The UK would like it to be flexible​ but the EU wants it to be robust and based on strong legal basis with less flexibility and no cherry picking. In any case, a new EU-UK relation could ​lead to changes in the structure ​of ​the EU’s relationships with other third countries in future. In an economic context, this challenge divides into four smaller questions.

  • ​Should (and, if yes, how) can the UK and the EU have a useful input into each other’s sovereign rule-making in a way that respects the autonomy of both jurisdictions?
  • If the agreement between the UK and the EU is a “living” agreement that can develop over time, how should that development be managed and new rules incorporated into the agreement?
  • How can the UK and the EU design a surveillance and supervision regime for the agreement that protects the integrity of the single market?
  • What institutions could the UK and EU design to resolve future disputes over the agreement?

The aim of this roundtable is to explore potential future options, and to consider their merits and weaknesses outside the framework of a “negotiation”.

This is an invitation-only, off-the-record roundtable for Bruegel’s members and a select number of experts. There will be no livestream.   

Schedule

Jul 13, 2018

12:00-12:30

Check-in and lunch

12:30-12:40

Kick-off remarks

Chair: Guntram B. Wolff, Director

12:40-13:00

Presentation

Chair: Guntram B. Wolff, Director

Raphael Hogarth, Research Associate, The Institute for Government

Jill Rutter, Programme Director, The Institute for Government

13:00-14:30

Roundtable discussion

14:30

End

Speakers

Raphael Hogarth

Research Associate, The Institute for Government

Jill Rutter

Programme Director, The Institute for Government

Guntram B. Wolff

Director

Location & Contact

Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels

Katja Knezevic

katja.knezevic@bruegel.org

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