Past Event

Domestic determinants of foreign policy in the United States and the European Union

Foreign policy begins at home, and in Europe and the United States the domestic drivers of foreign policy are shifting in important ways. The election of Donald Trump as U.S. president, the decision of British voters to leave the European Union, and popular pressures on governments of all stripes and colors to deal with the […]

Date: February 19, 2018, 5:00 pm Topic: Global Economics & Governance

Foreign policy begins at home, and in Europe and the United States the domestic drivers of foreign policy are shifting in important ways. The election of Donald Trump as U.S. president, the decision of British voters to leave the European Union, and popular pressures on governments of all stripes and colors to deal with the domestic consequences of global flows of people, money and terror all highlight the need for greater understanding of such domestic currents and their respective influence on U.S. and European foreign policies.

Following the publication of the book “Domestic Determinants of Foreign Policy in the United States and the European Union,” please join us at GMFUS to discuss the impact of domestic determinants on foreign policy and its implications for transatlantic relations.

This is an invitation-only event for Bruegel’s members and a selected number of experts. 

Speakers

Rosa Balfour

Senior fellow, German Marshall Fund of the Unites States

Maria Demertzis

Deputy Director

Steven Erlanger

Chief diplomatic correspondent in Europe, The New York Times

Daniel S. Hamilton

Executive director, Centre for Transatlantic Relations, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University

Rainer Münz

Special adviser on migration and demography at the European Political Strategy Centre (EPSC)

Teija Tiilikainen

Director and editor in chief, Finnish Institute of International Affairs

Location & Contact

The German Marshall Fund of the United States, Rue de la Loi 155, 1040 Bruxelles

Matilda Sevon

matilda.sevon@bruegel.org

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By: Zsolt Darvas Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation, Global Economics & Governance Date: December 1, 2017
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Working Paper

Returns on foreign assets and liabilities: exorbitant privileges and stabilising adjustments

Large stock of foreign assets and liabilities could foster international risk diversification. US, British and Japanese investors earn high yields on FDI assets, which might also relate to tax, intellectual property and financial sophistication issues. Valuation changes on net foreign assets had a stabilising impact.

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The Republican Tax Plan

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Past Event

Past Event

A conversation on USA economic policy with Kevin Hassett

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By: Silvia Merler Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: October 11, 2017
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