Past Event

EU budget post 2020: the next MFF

This is a closed-door event where we will discuss the EU budget post-2020.

Date: May 16, 2018, 11:00 am Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance

Following up on our March event, we are organising a round table in order to probe deeper into the questions surrounding the EU budget after the year 2020. Firstly, we will look at the new challenges that have emerged since the 2014-20 MFF negotiations, as well as the European Commission’s detailed proposal. The main question is that of what the EU wants to do. In the second part of the event we are ‘minding the gap’ by discussing how to fill the financing ‘hole’ left by Brexit. This is the reason why, we ask how financial instruments and flexibility tools around the EU budget (like the Juncker plan guarantee mechanism) could be used in the next MFF.

The event is held under the Chatham House Rule and will not be livestreamed.

EVENT MATERIALS

Presentation by Stefan Lehner

Schedule

May 16, 2018

11:00-12:45

SESSION 1: THE MULTI-ANNUAL FINANCIAL FRAMEWORK 2021-27

Chair: Zsolt Darvas, Senior Fellow

11:00-11:15

Presentation

Stefan Lehner, Director, Own Resources and Multiannual financial framework, European Commission, DG Budget

11:15-12:00

Panel discussion

Giacomo Benedetto, Jean Monnet Chair in European Union Budget Policy, Royal Holloway University of London

Marcin Kwasowski, Deputy Director, Department of Economic Policy of the EU, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Poland

Esperanza Samblas Quintana, Deputy Director in charge of European Budget, Spanish Ministry of Finance and Civil Service

Salvatore Serravalle, Deputy Secretary General in charge of the budget, Secretariat General for European affairs, France

12:00-12:45

Roundtable discussion

12:45-13:15

Lunch

13:15-14:30

SESSION 2: THE ROLE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS IN THE NEXT MFF

Chair: Grégory Claeys, Research Fellow

13:15-13:45

Panel discussion

Barbara Balke, Director of Legal Department Corporate, European Investment Bank

Antoine Quero-Mussot, Senior Expert on Innovative Financial Instruments, Directorate General for Budget

Laurent Zylberberg, President of the European Long Term Investors association (ELTI) and Director of institutional, European and international affairs at Caisse des Dépôts group

13:45-14:30

Roundtable discussion

14:30

End

Speakers

Barbara Balke

Director of Legal Department Corporate, European Investment Bank

Giacomo Benedetto

Jean Monnet Chair in European Union Budget Policy, Royal Holloway University of London

Grégory Claeys

Research Fellow

Zsolt Darvas

Senior Fellow

Marcin Kwasowski

Deputy Director, Department of Economic Policy of the EU, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Poland

Stefan Lehner

Director, Own Resources and Multiannual financial framework, European Commission, DG Budget

Antoine Quero-Mussot

Senior Expert on Innovative Financial Instruments, Directorate General for Budget

Esperanza Samblas Quintana

Deputy Director in charge of European Budget, Spanish Ministry of Finance and Civil Service

Salvatore Serravalle

Deputy Secretary General in charge of the budget, Secretariat General for European affairs, France

Laurent Zylberberg

President of the European Long Term Investors association (ELTI) and Director of institutional, European and international affairs at Caisse des Dépôts group

Location & Contact

Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels

Katja Knezevic

katja.knezevic@bruegel.org

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