Past Event

Innovation and economic reform in Europe and Japan

This event is co-organised by Bruegel and the Kobe University Graduate School of Economics.

Date: October 18, 2016, 9:00 am Global Economics & GovernanceInnovation & Competition Policy Tags & Topics

This event is part of the
“150 Years of Friendship Between Japan and Belgium” event series endorsed by the Embassy of Japan in Belgium.

Innovation is thought to be a key factor in bringing about economic recovery after the global economic japan_ambassy_150years_logo_vecto_cmykcrisis. On a global scale, Europe and Japan find themselves in a more worrying situation than the US. One reason for this is the weaker link between innovation and macro economy in Europe and Japan compared to the U.S. Europe shows a slow overall growth and lacks much needed pro-growth reforms. The Japanese economy, which began to deteriorate after the collapse of the bubble in the early 1990s, had stagnated throughout two decades.

Innovation is one pillar of the drastic economic policies, known as ‘Abenomics,’ which have been in force since autumn 2012 to address this stagnation. Although, innovation represents the introduction of both novel and more efficient technologies, it cannot become an important factor of economic recovery without labour relocation, education and training, and the right socio-economic reconstruction. It is debated whether innovation effectively moves the economy away from secular stagnation. This event aims to bring efficient and realistic proposals as to what the solutions could be and what policy measures would support it.

Read full Event summary

Video and audio recordings



Event materials

Event summary

Presentation by Taji Hagiwara

Presentation by Remy Lecat

Presentation by Scott Marcus

Presentation by Yoichi Matsubayashi

Presentation by Koji Nakamura

Presentation by Georgios Petropolous

Presentation by Kazufumi Yugami

Schedule

Oct 18, 2016

9:00-9:30

Check in and breakfast

9:30-9:45

Welcome

Tamotsu Nakamura, Professor and Vice Dean, the Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University

Guntram B. Wolff, Director

9:45-11:00

First Panel: innovation -review from Europe and Japan

Chair: Tamotsu Nakamura, Professor and Vice Dean, the Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University

Taiji Hagiwara, Professor, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University

J. Scott Marcus, Senior Fellow

11:00-11:15

Coffee break

11:15-13:00

Second panel: Innovation, labormarket transformation and and socio-economic reconstruction in Europe and Japan

Chair: Zsolt Darvas, Senior Fellow

Jonathan Cave, Senior Tutor, Economics, University of Warwick,

Kazufumi Yugami, Associate Professor, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University

Yoichi Matsubayashi, Professor, Graduate school of Economics, Kobe University

Georgios Petropoulos, Research Fellow

Additional speakers to be confirmed

13:00-14:00

Lunch

14:00-15:15

Policy considerations and conclusions

Chair: Guntram B. Wolff, Director

Beñat Bilbao Osorio, Senior Economist, European Commission, DG RTD

Koji Nakamura, Associate Director-General and Division Head, Economic Research Division, Research and Statistics Department, Bank of Japan

Rémy Lecat, Head, Structural Policy Analysis Division, Banque de France

Additional speakers to be confirmed

Speakers

jonathan-cave-picture

Jonathan Cave

Senior Tutor, Economics, University of Warwick,

benat-photo

Beñat Bilbao Osorio

Senior Economist, European Commission, DG RTD

Zsolt Darvas

Zsolt Darvas

Senior Fellow

taiji-hagiwara-ku

Taiji Hagiwara

Professor, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University

remy-lecat-picture

Rémy Lecat

Head, Structural Policy Analysis Division, Banque de France

Scott Marcus

J. Scott Marcus

Senior Fellow

Yoichi Matsubayashi

Yoichi Matsubayashi

Professor, Graduate school of Economics, Kobe University

koji-nakamura-boj

Koji Nakamura

Associate Director-General and Division Head, Economic Research Division, Research and Statistics Department, Bank of Japan

tamotsu-nakamura-ku

Tamotsu Nakamura

Professor and Vice Dean, the Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University

IMG_20151119_103626

Georgios Petropoulos

Research Fellow

Guntram B. Wolff

Guntram B. Wolff

Director

kazufumi-yugami-ku

Kazufumi Yugami

Associate Professor, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University

Location & Contact

Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels

Matilda Sevón

Matilda Sevón

matilda.sevon@bruegel.org +32 2 227 4212

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