Past Event

Protecting EU firms without protectionism

Do we need more effective support for EU companies, more targeted to threatened sectors of strategic importance to the EU? Do we need to revise our competition policy rules on state aid to allow for a more strategic industrial policy support? Do we need new policy approaches to prepare for a changing global environment?

Date: May 3, 2018, 9:30 am Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy

VIDEO & AUDIO RECORDINGS

EVENT MATERIALS

Presentation by Reinhilde Veugelers

SUMMARY

EU companies are facing a global competitive environment which is rapidly changing, with the danger of turning into a more distorted global level playing field. On the one hand, there is the rapid rise of non-market economies (eg China) with SOEs, state support for private companies & sectors; preferential treatment of national companies in national markets, public support for international expansion of firms. At the same time, there is the rise in market economies of nationalist/protectionist/strategic rhetoric (eg US) to protect their national companies and close their national markets for non-national firms.

What should the reaction of the EU be to these trends? How should it support its companies’ competitiveness on global markets? How open should EU markets be for non-EU firms amidst these trends. A robust innovation and industrial policy is necessary to ensure that Europe, on the back of a better functioning Single Market, can continue to develop its strengths. But do we need more than this? Do we need new policy approaches to prepare for a changing global environment?

The discussion on the policy response is not only politically difficult, but also analytically complex, as it covers a mix of instruments from trade policy, competition policy and industrial policy. Do we need to reform the multilateral trade system, with reciprocity a more prominent component, or do we need to abandon a multilateral trade policy approach altogether and move to bilaterals? Do we need more effective support for EU companies, more targeted to threatened sectors of strategic importance to the EU? Do we need to revise our competition policy rules on state aid to allow for a more strategic industrial policy support? Do we need to revisit our competition guidelines on take-overs, particularly when the acquirer is a non-EU non-market actor in a sector of strategic importance? Is the EU sufficiently coordinating between trade policy, competition policy and industrial policy and between Member States and the EU?

 

Schedule

May 3, 2018

09:30-10:00

Check in and welcome coffee

10:00-11:30

Panel Discussion

Chair: Reinhilde Veugelers, Senior Fellow

Vincent Aussilloux, Director Economics and Finance, France Stratégie

Tomas Baert, Head of Unit – Trade Strategy, European Commission, DG TRADE

Paolo Casini, Economist, Chief Economist Team, DG GROWTH, European Commission

Gert-Jan Koopman, Deputy Director General, European Commission, DG COMP

André Sapir, Senior Fellow

Focco Vijselaar, Chief Economist at the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy

11:30-12:00

Q&A

12:00

End

Speakers

Vincent Aussilloux

Director Economics and Finance, France Stratégie

Tomas Baert

Head of Unit – Trade Strategy, European Commission, DG TRADE

Paolo Casini

Economist, Chief Economist Team, DG GROWTH, European Commission

Gert-Jan Koopman

Deputy Director General, European Commission, DG COMP

André Sapir

Senior Fellow

Reinhilde Veugelers

Senior Fellow

Focco Vijselaar

Chief Economist at the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy

Location & Contact

Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels

Matilda Sevon

matilda.sevon@bruegel.org

Read about event More on this topic

Past Event

Past Event

Competition Policy and Extraterritoriality

An in-depth look at competition policy.

Speakers: Guntram B. Wolff and Jean Pisani-Ferry Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: October 16, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

The 2018 Nobel Prize: Growth and the environment

The 2018 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences has been awarded jointly to William Nordhaus and Paul Romer for integrating respectively climate change and technological innovation into long-run macroeconomic analysis. We review how economists reacted to the announcement.

By: Silvia Merler Topic: Energy & Climate Date: October 15, 2018
Read about event More on this topic

Upcoming Event

Nov
21
14:00

Competition Policy for the digital age

How can competition policy adapt to market changes caused by new technologies, digital platforms and big data companies?

Speakers: Ana Botin, Jorge Padilla and Tommaso Valletti Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels
Read article More by this author

Parliamentary Testimony

European Parliament

Brexit and industry & space policy

Testimony before the European Parliament's Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE).

By: Reinhilde Veugelers Topic: European Parliament, Innovation & Competition Policy, Testimonies Date: September 25, 2018
Read about event

Past Event

Past Event

China's digital economy

How to measure China's digital economy?

Speakers: Alicia García-Herrero, Claudia Vernotti and Reinhilde Veugelers Topic: Global Economics & Governance, Innovation & Competition Policy Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: September 17, 2018
Read article Download PDF

External Publication

Export and patent specialization in low carbon technologies

The low-carbon technology sector is going through a period of disruptive innovation and strongly increased investment, which is likely to continue. Global investment in new renewable power is the largest area of electricity spending. The political momentum to combat climate change was reinforced in the Paris Agreement, when almost every country in the world agreed to aim for carbon neutrality in the second half of the century.

By: Robert Kalcik and Georg Zachmann Topic: Energy & Climate, Innovation & Competition Policy Date: August 7, 2018
Read article Download PDF More on this topic More by this author

External Publication

The impact of artificial intelligence on employment

Technological development, and in particular digitalisation, has major implications for labour markets. Assessing its impact will be crucial for developing policies that promote efficient labour markets for the benefit of workers, employers and societies as a whole.

By: Georgios Petropoulos Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: July 31, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Opinion

Is Europe America’s Friend or Foe?

Since Donald Trump took office as US president, a new cottage industry in rational theories of his seemingly irrational behavior has developed. On one issue, however, no amount of theorizing has made sense of Trump: his treatment of America's oldest and most reliable ally.

By: Jean Pisani-Ferry Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: July 30, 2018
Read article

Parliamentary Testimony

European Parliament

The role of independent expertise in legislative process

Testimony before the European Parliament Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO).

By: Zsolt Darvas and J. Scott Marcus Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, European Parliament, Testimonies Date: July 18, 2018
Read about event More on this topic

Past Event

Past Event

Should we revisit the patent system for pharmaceutical products?

Analysis of the legal issues with the current IP system for regulated market authorisations for pharmaceutical products, as well as its economic effects.

Speakers: Arno Hartmann, Christian Jervelund, Margaret K. Kyle, Roberto Romandini, Bruno van Pottelsberghe, Amaryllis Verhoeven and Reinhilde Veugelers Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: July 9, 2018
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Opinion

Can Multilateralism Adapt?

Global governance requires rules, because flexibility and goodwill alone cannot tackle the hardest shared problems. With multilateralism under attack, the narrow path ahead is to determine, on a case-by-case basis, the minimum requirements of effective collective action, and to forge agreement on reforms that fulfill these conditions.

By: Jean Pisani-Ferry Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: July 3, 2018
Read about event More on this topic

Past Event

Past Event

Trade war trinity: analysis of global consequences

Analysis of the long-term impact of the trade war and its three key players: EU, US, and China.

Speakers: Alicia García-Herrero, Ignasi Guardans and Carl B Hamilton Topic: Global Economics & Governance Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: June 28, 2018
Load more posts