brain drain

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Brainless recovery - brain drain in the aftermath of the crisis

Throughout the 2000s, European countries have been broadly successful at attracting large numbers of highly-skilled individuals. The euro area crisis has most likely significantly altered these pre-existing trends. As growth remains subdued and unemployment stabilises at high levels, spending cuts in R&D might leave countries in the periphery more exposed to “brain drain”.

By: Alessio Terzi Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: December 18, 2014
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Fact of the week: Not one European city in the top 10 for tech talent

Two recent LinkedIn analyses show some interesting facts about work-related migration in the 21st century and how this reshapes the world’s economic environment. The data shows that European countries tend to be net losers from migration of skilled workers and that they lag behind the US and especially India in the ranking of cities able to attract tech talents.

By: Silvia Merler Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: October 25, 2014
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"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses"

The impact of the demographic trend on Europe is particularly concerning.  The reason is that Europe’s ‘native’ workforce is ageing and the number of graduates from all levels of education is declining and will continue   to decline in the coming decades.

By: Rainer Münz Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Global Economics & Governance Date: March 7, 2014
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Policy Brief

The global race for talent: Europe's migration challenge

In an ageing world with demographic and economic imbalances, the number of international migrants is likely to rise during the twenty-first century. The geography of migration flows is changing, however. Mobile people will be increasingly attracted by faster-growing economies.

By: Rainer Münz Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: March 4, 2014
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Where does the youth exodus come from?

Intra-EU migration increased before the crisis, especially into booming countries like Ireland and Spain. What happened during the crisis?

By: Zsolt Darvas Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: June 10, 2013
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Blogs review: the youth unemployment crisis

What’s at stake: The global youth unemployment rate, which was already high before the start of the Great Recession, has reached skyrocketing levels in the past two years. While youth unemployment rates have increased in almost all countries, there has been wide divergence in the size of this increase – often reflecting the country specific aspects of the transition from school to work. For most, if not all, a serious discussion about the potential “scarring effects” induced by such a situation appears, however, warranted if we want to avoid having one generation permanently bear the burden of this crisis.

By: Jérémie Cohen-Setton Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: July 23, 2012
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Blueprint

Divisions of labour: rethinking Europe's migration policy

This Blueprint examines why and how Europe‘s migration challenge should be urgently addressed. Jakob von Weizsäcker identifies three priority areas for EU policy action and concrete policy suggestions which could fit with the immigration agenda of the French presidency.

By: Jakob von Weizsäcker Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Global Economics & Governance Date: October 8, 2008
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High-skilled Migrants: Welcome to Europe!

Jakob von Weizsäcker explains why Europe should welcome high-skilled immigrants from all parts of the world with open arms. Click here   to download this comment. This comment was also published by Telos.

By: Jakob von Weizsäcker Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Global Economics & Governance Date: May 10, 2006