G7

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Opinion

The global economy’s three games

In this column, Jean Pisani-Ferry portrays the current international economic and geopolitical order as increasingly reminiscent of chess. Three key players: the US, China and a loose coalition of the other G7 members play three games simultaneously, and no one knows which game will take precedence.

By: Jean Pisani-Ferry Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: October 29, 2018
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Blog Post

The G7 is dead, long live the G7

The summit in Charlevoix left behind a Group of Seven in complete disarray. The authors think that the G-group, in its current formulation, no longer has a reason to exist, and it should be replaced with a more representative group of countries. In this fast-changing world, is the G7 only a relic of the past?

By: Jim O‘Neill and Alessio Terzi Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: June 13, 2018
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Blog Post

A vade mecum for Italy’s G7 presidency

Following Germany this year and Japan in 2016, Italy will assume the rotating presidency of the G7 in 2017. However, even the global governance aficionados could wonder whether this matters at all.

By: Alessio Terzi and Matteo Villa Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: December 16, 2015
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Parliamentary Testimony

Italian Parliament

Global economic governance: Italy's role in the G7 and G20

This paper was produced for the Italian Parliament and Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

By: Alessio Terzi and Matteo Villa Topic: Italian Parliament, Testimonies Date: December 16, 2015
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Policy Contribution

The twenty-first century needs a better G20 and a new G7+

In an environment of rapid change in global patterns of trade and wealth creation, a new revamped (but highly representative) grouping should be created within the G20, to provide leadership on key economic policy matters. Euro-area members should give up their individual seats in this G7+, allowing room for China and other large emerging economies. 

By: Jim O‘Neill and Alessio Terzi Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: November 14, 2014