Maastricht Treaty

Read article More on this topic

Opinion

Eurozone QE and bank profitability: Why it is too early to taper

In the eyes of the critics, the quantitative easing programs have been of little help to growth and inflation and have instead been an attack on savers, undermining the profitability of banks and insurances. Do these arguments stand scrutiny?

By: Maria Demertzis and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: December 8, 2016
Read article Download PDF More by this author

Policy Contribution

European Parliament

The impact of the legal and operational structures of euro-area banks on their resolvability

Following the financial crisis, the question of how to handle a big bank’s collapse has come to the fore. This Policy Contribution evaluates the obstacles to resolvability that the legal and operational structures of the large euro-area banks could pose to the European Union’s new resolution regime.

By: Dirk Schoenmaker Topic: European Parliament, Finance & Financial Regulation, Testimonies Date: December 6, 2016
Read article Download PDF

Policy Contribution

European Parliament

What impact does the ECB’s quantitative easing policy have on bank profitability?

This Policy Contribution shows that the effect of the ECB’s QE programme on bank profitability has not yet had a dramatically negative effect on bank operations.

By: Maria Demertzis and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, European Parliament, Testimonies Date: November 30, 2016
Read article Download PDF More on this topic More by this author

Working Paper

Income convergence during the crisis: did EU funds provide a buffer?

This paper shows that economic convergence continued during the crisis for the EU as a whole, although at a slower pace, but for regions in the EU14, and especially in the euro area, convergence appears to have stopped during the crisis, or even switched to a divergence path.

By: Silvia Merler Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: October 18, 2016
Read article Download PDF More on this topic

Policy Contribution

What are the prerequisites for a euro-area fiscal capacity?

In this Policy Contribution, Maria Demertzsis and Guntram B. Wolff discuss three progressive steps for strengthening the fiscal framework at the euro-area level. These lead to less interference in national fiscal policymaking thanks to a more credible no-bailout clause, increased risk sharing and different degrees of provision of euro-area-wide public goods and fiscal stabilisation.

By: Maria Demertzis and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: September 9, 2016
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

The IMF’s performance on financial sector aspects of the euro area crisis

The recently published in-depth evaluation of the International Monetary Fund (IMF)’s role in the euro area crisis highlights important contrasts in the area of financial services. The IMF provided highly valuable analysis and recommendations to the EU on its banking sector and related policies. In individual countries (leaving aside Cyprus and the second Greek programme, not covered by this evaluation), the financial-sector aspects of the IMF’s interventions were highly successful in Ireland and Spain, ambiguous in Greece, and a missed opportunity in Portugal.

By: Nicolas Véron Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: August 29, 2016
Read article Download PDF More on this topic More by this author

Policy Contribution

The IMF’s role in the euro-area crisis: financial sector aspects

Nicolas Véron reviews in-depth the role played by the IMF in understanding the financial-sector dynamics of the euro-area crisis. The IMF was the first public authority to acknowledge the role of the bank-sovereign vicious circle and to articulate a clear vision of banking union as an essential policy response. At national level, the IMF’s approach to the financial sector was appropriate and successful in Ireland and Spain, more limited in the Greek Stand-By Arrangement, and less compelling in Portugal.

By: Nicolas Véron Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: August 29, 2016
Read article More on this topic

Blog Post

European banking supervision: compelling start, lingering challenges

The new European banking supervision system is broadly effective and, in line with the claim often made by its leading officials, tough and fair, but there are significant areas for future improvement.

By: Dirk Schoenmaker and Nicolas Véron Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: June 8, 2016
Read article Download PDF More on this topic

Blueprint

European banking supervision: the first eighteen months

The Blueprint provides a review of the first 18 months of European banking supervision. It reviews the overall situation and the situation in a number of euro-area countries. It provides important insights into the start of a new policy regime that involves profound change for the European banking landscape

By: Dirk Schoenmaker and Nicolas Véron Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: June 8, 2016
Read article More on this topic

Opinion

How to reform EU fiscal rules

The current inefficient European fiscal framework should be replaced with a system based on rules that are more conducive to the two objectives of public debt sustainability and fiscal stabilisation.

By: Grégory Claeys and Zsolt Darvas Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: April 12, 2016
Read article Download PDF More on this topic

Policy Contribution

A proposal to revive the European Fiscal Framework

The current European fiscal framework is inefficient. It should be replaced with a system based on rules more suited to the two core objectives: public debt sustainability and fiscal stabilisation. The rules should be more transparent and easier to implement. These reforms would promote greater compliance.

By: Grégory Claeys, Zsolt Darvas and Alvaro Leandro Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: March 29, 2016
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

The Eurozone needs less heterogeneity

Misalignments of real exchange rates continue to be the most visible and painful symptom of asymmetric shocks within the Eurozone. An important factor behind such misalignment is the difference in national wage formation and bargaining systems, especially between core and periphery members. This column argues that all members need to have institutions that ensure wage developments are in line with productivity developments. This would eliminate an important source of asymmetric behaviour and reduce resistance to EZ-wide fiscal mechanisms capable of absorbing asymmetric shocks.

By: André Sapir Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 17, 2016
Load more posts