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Blog Post

The 2018 Nobel Prize: Growth and the environment

The 2018 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences has been awarded jointly to William Nordhaus and Paul Romer for integrating respectively climate change and technological innovation into long-run macroeconomic analysis. We review how economists reacted to the announcement.

By: Silvia Merler Topic: Energy & Climate Date: October 15, 2018
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Upcoming Event

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Competition Policy for the digital age

How can competition policy adapt to market changes caused by new technologies, digital platforms and big data companies?

Speakers: Ana Botin, Jorge Padilla and Tommaso Valletti Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels
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Blog Post

Digesting the Salzburg Summit

As the moment of truth for Brexit negotiations is approaching, with the October European Council around the corner, we review opinions on the outcome and meaning of the Salzburg summit.

By: Silvia Merler Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: October 1, 2018
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Podcast

Podcast

Backstage: Brexit consequences for EU’s ICT policy

Bruegel senior fellow Scott Marcus welcomes former European Regulators Group chairman Kip Meek to explore the consequences of Brexit for ICT policy-making in Europe.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: September 25, 2018
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Parliamentary Testimony

European Parliament

Brexit and industry & space policy

Testimony before the European Parliament's Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE).

By: Reinhilde Veugelers Topic: European Parliament, Innovation & Competition Policy, Testimonies Date: September 25, 2018
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Opinion

Japan must boost R&D to keep rising Chinese rivals at bay

As China shifts into a more advanced industrialised economy, Japan has slowly but surely lost to some of its comparative advantages to its rival. One possible solution to help the government keep pace would be to concentrate research and development efforts on a few key sectors where Japanese players still hold a large competitive lead.

By: Alicia García-Herrero Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: September 20, 2018
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Past Event

Past Event

China's digital economy

How to measure China's digital economy?

Speakers: Alicia García-Herrero, Claudia Vernotti and Reinhilde Veugelers Topic: Global Economics & Governance, Innovation & Competition Policy Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: September 17, 2018
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External Publication

Export and patent specialization in low carbon technologies

The low-carbon technology sector is going through a period of disruptive innovation and strongly increased investment, which is likely to continue. Global investment in new renewable power is the largest area of electricity spending. The political momentum to combat climate change was reinforced in the Paris Agreement, when almost every country in the world agreed to aim for carbon neutrality in the second half of the century.

By: Robert Kalcik and Georg Zachmann Topic: Energy & Climate, Innovation & Competition Policy Date: August 7, 2018
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External Publication

The impact of artificial intelligence on employment

Technological development, and in particular digitalisation, has major implications for labour markets. Assessing its impact will be crucial for developing policies that promote efficient labour markets for the benefit of workers, employers and societies as a whole.

By: Georgios Petropoulos Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: July 31, 2018
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Opinion

Europe should avoid a no-deal Brexit

The UK government finally tabled a serious proposal for the country’s future relationship with the European Union (EU). The White Paper puts the ball in the EU court as it now has to say what kind of relationship it wants to establish with its neighbour.

By: Jean Pisani-Ferry, Norbert Röttgen, André Sapir, Paul Tucker and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 24, 2018
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Opinion

A Brexit deal is still not achieved

The UK paper should be seriously considered. While it breaks a number of European red-lines, it is also an attempt to solve some issues. The question is whether the EU will be ready to seriously negotiate. Geostrategic considerations suggest that it is time for the EU to do so.

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 13, 2018
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Past Event

Past Event

Designing a new institutional framework for UK-EU relations

Finding the right way forward for the EU and the UK.

Speakers: Raphael Hogarth, Jill Rutter and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: July 13, 2018