Blog Post

29 charts that explain Brexit

From financial services to the creative industry, from trade to migration, this selection of charts maps out the troubled waters of Brexit, and provides a compass through blogs and publications Bruegel scholars have written on the topic.

By: Date: March 28, 2017 Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance

From: The day after Brexit: what do we know? by Uuriintuya Batsaikhan



From: What is the age profile of UK immigrants? by Zsolt Darvas

From: Fog in the Channel: Brexit through the eyes of international trade by Pia Hüttl and Silvia Merler



From: Trade flows between the US, UK and EU27: what goes where? by Filippo Biondi and Robert Kalcik

Trade flows between the EU, the US and the UK

 

From: Brexit: who trades what with the UK? by Silvia Merler



From: Should the UK pull out of the EU customs union? by André Sapir

From: What consequences would a post-Brexit China-UK trade deal have for the EU? by Alicia Garcia-Herrero and Jianwei Xu

uk china

From: Lost passports: a guide to the Brexit fallout for the City of London by Dirk Schoenmaker

From: Brexit endangers London’s status as a financial hub by Pia Hüttl and Silvia Merler



From: Northern Ireland and EU funds by Pia Hüttl and Jaume Marti Romero

ni

From: Brexit and the European financial system: mapping markets, players and job by Uuriintuya Batsaikhan, Robert Kalcik, Dirk Schoenmaker

finance

From: Making the best of Brexit for the EU27 financial system by André Sapir, Dirk Schoenmaker, Nicolas Veron

markets

From: The impact of Brexit on UK tertiary education and R&D by Maria Demertzis and Enrico Nano

From: The UK’s Brexit bill: could EU assets partially offset liabilities? by Zsolt Darvas, Konstantinos Efstathiou, Inês Goncalves Raposo

From: Single market access from outside the EU: three key prerequisites by Zsolt Darvas

 


From: Questionable immigration claims in the Brexit white paper by Zsolt Darvas

From: Tweeting Brexit: Narative building and sentiment analysis by Henrik Müller and Giuseppe Porcaro

The figure depicts the results by showing the overall mood in the “Twittersphere” over time. Values of zero represent a balanced view where tweets containing a predominantly pro-Brexit (positive values) and a pro-Remain stance (negative values) offset each other.

tweet

 


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