Parliamentary Testimony

The potential impact of Brexit on ICT policy

Testimony before the European Parliament's Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE).

By: Date: June 27, 2018 Topic: European Parliament

The potential impact of Brexit
on ICT policy, and possible
ways forward for the EU27

 

On 19 June 2018, J. Scott Marcus testified before the European Parliament’s Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE).

He gave a general overview of the potential impacts of Brexit and examined the implications for policymaking and regulation. More precisely, the author confirmed that the form of exit matters and will have different implications for existing regulatory frameworks. Also, he discussed the implications on innovation arguing that a complete break between the UK and the EU would have negative impact on the EU27 in
areas such as AI, and should be avoided.

A video of the testimony is available here.

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