Scholars

Simone Tagliapietra

Research Fellow

Expertise: Energy Markets, Energy and Climate Policy, Neighborhood Policy CV: Download CV Twitter: @Tagliapietra_S

Simone Tagliapietra, an Italian citizen, is Research Fellow at Bruegel, Adjunct Professor of Global Energy Fundamentals at the Johns Hopkins University SAIS Europe and Senior Researcher at the Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.

He is also Lecturer at the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Senior Associate Research Fellow at the Istituto per gli Studi di Politica Internazionale and Non-resident Fellow at the Payne Institute of the Colorado School of Mines.

He is an expert in international energy and climate issues, with a record of numerous publications covering the international energy markets, the European energy and climate policy and the Euro-Mediterranean energy relations.

He recently authored the books 'Energy in Africa' (Springer, 2018), 'The European Gas Markets' (Palgrave, 2017), 'Energy Relations in the Mediterranean' (Palgrave, 2017), 'The Geoeconomics of Sovereign Wealth Funds and Renewable Energy' (Claeys&Casteels, 2013).

Before joining Bruegel in 2015, he also worked at the Istanbul Policy Center of Sabanci University and at the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe.

He is a Member of the Editorial Board of the European Energy Journal and a Senior Expert Member of the Euro-Med Economists Association.

Born in 1988, he holds a PhD in Institutions and Policies from the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore.

Simone speaks Italian, English and French.

Declaration of interests 2016

Declaration of interests 2017

Declaration of interests 2018

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Opinion

Under swollen tides, Venice says more about our future than our past

While tides high enough to submerge Venice used to be rare, occurring every two to three decades, they have now become increasingly regular. Five of the ten highest tides in recorded history occurred over the last 20 years, with the most recent one having occurred just last year. Is this the new normal?

By: Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate Date: November 18, 2019
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Opinion

Four pillars to make or break the European Green Deal

The recipe for a successful European Green Deal is as simple as it is breath-taking: to intelligently promote deep decarbonisation by accompanying the economic and industrial transformation this necessarily implies, and by ensuring the social inclusiveness of the overall process.

By: Simone Tagliapietra, Grégory Claeys and Georg Zachmann Topic: Energy & Climate Date: November 14, 2019
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Policy Contribution

How to make the European Green Deal work

Ursula von der Leyen has proposed a European Green Deal that would make Europe climate neutral by 2050. With this Policy Contribution, the authors provide a first analysis on how to make this initiative work.

By: Grégory Claeys, Simone Tagliapietra and Georg Zachmann Topic: Energy & Climate, European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: November 5, 2019
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Opinion

The importance of economic diversification in the Middle East

Simone Tagliapietra's latest opinion on the Financial Times, on the role of Middle East as cornerstones of global energy

By: Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate Date: October 2, 2019
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Opinion

Coming soon: a massive laboratory for ‘Green New Deals’

Green New Deals’ are not going to turn countries into ‘hermit nations’,but they are not going to turn countries into economic paradises either. They simply are tools to achieve something more basic: ensure that climate change does not compromise our life in this planet. And this already looks like a good reason for them to be well worth our time.

By: Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate Date: October 1, 2019
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Blog Post

Questions to the First Executive Vice President-designate Timmermans

For the first time ever, a large economy will cut a path to climate neutrality by 2050 – a milestone that scientists consider to be the only sensible way to protect the world from the more dramatic impacts of climate change.

By: Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate, European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: September 25, 2019
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Opinion

The Democrats need to have a climate-only TV debate. For Americans and for the rest of us

A series of global summits mean the months between now and November 2020 will be crucial to the future of climate change.

By: Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: August 6, 2019
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External Publication

The impact of the global energy transition on MENA oil and gas producers

Endowed with half of the world's known oil and gas reserves, the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region is cornerstone of the global energy architecture. This article argues that – together with the pressing need to create jobs opportunities for a large and youthful population – the possibility of the world moving more aggressively towards a low-carbon future should represent a key argument for the implementation of economic reform programmes.

By: Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate Date: August 5, 2019
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Opinion

Von der Leyen’s Green Deal isn’t just a plan for the environment

Ursula von der Leyen's proposal of a European Green Deal is ambitious and urgent. Not only does it aim to reduce the continent's emissions, but it also has the potential to grow the EU's economy and transform the bloc's politics.

By: Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate Date: July 18, 2019
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Policy Brief

The European Union energy transition: key priorities for the next five years

The new members of the European Parliament and European Commission who start their mandates in 2019 should put in place major policy elements to unleash the energy transition. It is becoming economically and technically feasible, with most of the necessary technologies now available and technology costs declining. The cost of the transition would be similar to that of maintaining the existing system, if appropriate policies and regulations are put in place.

By: Simone Tagliapietra, Georg Zachmann, Ottmar Edenhofer, Jean-Michel Glachant, Pedro Linares and Andreas Loeschel Topic: Energy & Climate Date: July 9, 2019
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