Past Event

EU-Turkey energy and climate dialogues 2019

What is the cost of capital for wind energy investments in Turkey?

Date: January 17, 2019, 9:00 am Topic: Energy & Climate

video & audio recordings

summary

At this event we discussed the paper “Estimating the cost of capital for wind energy investments in Turkey”, written by Gustav Fredriksson, Simone Tagliapietra, and Georg Zachmann.

The paper proposes an estimation of the cost of capital for wind energy investments in Turkey. Seeing as wind energy, like all renewable energies, is highly capital intensive compared to investments into conventional energy, the cost of capital represents a crucial element in every wind energy investment decision. Simply put, the high cost of capital substantially increases the cost of investing in wind power plants, putting investments at risk. Given the primary role of wind in Turkey’s 2023 energy strategy, it is therefore important to have a better understanding of this factor.

The event was organised in collaboration with the Istanbul Policy Center and with the support of Stiftung Mercator.

presentation by gustav fredriksson

Presentation – Estimating the cost of capital for wind energy investments in Turkey

Schedule

Jan 17, 2019

09:00-09:30

Check-in and coffee

09:30-09:45

Opening remarks

Pelin Oğuz, Program Coordinator, Mercator-IPC Fellowship

James Rizzo, Head of Istanbul Office, Stiftung Mercator

09:45-10:15

Presentation

Gustav Fredriksson, PhD Candidate at ETH Zürich in Energy & Environmental Economics

10:15-11:45

Panel discussion

Chair: Umit Sahin, Climate Studies Coordinator, IPC

Can Hakyemez, Manager, Economic Research Department, TSKB

Canan Ozsoy, President and CEO, GE Turkey

Mehmet Erdem Yasar, Principal banker, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)

Massimo d`Eufemia, Head Representative, European Investment Bank in Turkey

11:45-12:30

Q&A

12:30-13:30

Lunch

13:30

End

Speakers

Massimo d`Eufemia

Head Representative, European Investment Bank in Turkey

Gustav Fredriksson

PhD Candidate at ETH Zürich in Energy & Environmental Economics

Can Hakyemez

Manager, Economic Research Department, TSKB

Pelin Oğuz

Program Coordinator, Mercator-IPC Fellowship

Canan Ozsoy

President and CEO, GE Turkey

James Rizzo

Head of Istanbul Office, Stiftung Mercator

Umit Sahin

Climate Studies Coordinator, IPC

Simone Tagliapietra

Research Fellow

Mehmet Erdem Yasar

Principal banker, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)

Location & Contact

Istanbul Policy Center, Bereketzade Mahallesi, Bankalar Cd. No:2, 34421 Beyoğlu/İstanbul, Turkey

Katja Knezevic

katja.knezevic@bruegel.org

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