Past Event

Is the European automotive industry ready for the global electric vehicle revolution?

How can Europe catch up on the global electric vehicle race?

Date: February 12, 2019, 12:30 pm Topic: Energy & Climate

video & audio recordings


The automotive sector is currently at the centre of a global transformation, driven by four key trends: electrification, autonomous driving, sharing and connected cars. Bruegel fellows Reinhilde Veugelers and Simone Tagliapietra have recently published a policy contribution investigating the position of the European automotive industry in a scenario in which electrification substantially progresses. The results are encouraging for Europe: EU companies entered late the global electric vehicle race, but on the basis of their analysis it is not yet too late for them to catch up and make the best of this change. However, they also find that if Europe wants to succeed in the global electric vehicle race, its automotive industry will have to move into higher gear to meet the global – notably Chinese – competition.

presentations

Jacques Pieraerts – Presentation

Reinhilde Veugelers – Presentation

Schedule

Feb 12, 2019

12:30-13:00

Check-in and lunch

13:00-13:20

Presentation

Reinhilde Veugelers, Senior Fellow

13:20-14:10

Panel Discussion

Chair: Simone Tagliapietra, Research Fellow

Eric Feunteun, Electric Vehicle Program Director, Groupe Renault

Jacques Pieraerts, Vice President, Communication, External and Environmental Affair, Toyota Motor Europe

Julia Poliscanova, Manager, Clean Vehicles and Emobility, Transport & Environment

14:10-14:30

Q&A

14:30

End

Speakers

Eric Feunteun

Electric Vehicle Program Director, Groupe Renault

Jacques Pieraerts

Vice President, Communication, External and Environmental Affair, Toyota Motor Europe

Julia Poliscanova

Manager, Clean Vehicles and Emobility, Transport & Environment

Simone Tagliapietra

Research Fellow

Reinhilde Veugelers

Senior Fellow

Location & Contact

Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels

Katja Knezevic

katja.knezevic@bruegel.org

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