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Past Event

The economic impact of venture capital investment in Europe

This Finance Focus Breakfast discussed the economic impact of venture capital investment in Europe. The presentation by Massimo Colombo was followed by comments by Karen Wilson and an open discussion moderated by Reinhilde Veugelers. This session of the Finance Focus Breakfast series was devoted to venture capital (VC) funds and their economic role in the […]

Date: May 10, 2012, 7:15 am Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation

This Finance Focus Breakfast discussed the economic impact of venture capital investment in Europe. The presentation by Massimo Colombo was followed by comments by Karen Wilson and an open discussion moderated by Reinhilde Veugelers.

This session of the Finance Focus Breakfast series was devoted to venture capital (VC) funds and their economic role in the EU. It was focused on the presentation and discussion of results from a large EU-funded research endeavor (VICO project), including the impact of VC funding on firm growth performance and the importance of VC investments from the view point of the innovation policy community as well as from the financial markets’ perspective.

Speakers

Massimo Colombo is professor of Economics of Technical Change in the Politecnico di Milano, Italy’s largest technical university, and the research coordinator of the VICO project. He holds a degree in Electronic Engineering from Politecnico di Milan and has been a member of its faculty since 1984.

Karen Wilson is a Senior Fellow at the Kauffman Foundation and also works in the Structural Policy Division of the Science, Technology and Industry Directorate at the OECD. Previously, she held senior positions in the venture capital industry, at the World Economic Forum in Geneva, and at Harvard Business School as director of its Global Initiative. She holds a degree in mathematics and management from Carnegie Mellon University and an MBA from Harvard Business School.

Video

After the event, Karen Wilson and Massimo Colombo gave an interview focused on their policy recommendations about venture capital investments in Europe.

<iframe width=”560″ height=”315″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/BBnTE6AHAjk” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

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Schedule

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Opinion

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By: Jean Pisani-Ferry Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: December 5, 2019
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Working Paper

The state of China-European Union economic relations

More can be done to capture the untapped trade and investment opportunities that exist between China and the EU. China’s size and dynamism, and its recent shift from an export-led to a domestic demand-led growth model, mean that these opportunities are likely to grow with time.

By: Uri Dadush, Marta Domínguez-Jiménez and Tianlang Gao Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: November 20, 2019
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Working Paper

How does China fare on the Russian market? Implications for the European Union

China’s economic ties with Russia are deepening. Meanwhile, Europe remains Russia’s largest trading partner, lender and investor. An analysis of China’s ties with Russia, indicate that China seems to have become more of a competitor to the European Union on Russia’s market. Competition over investment and lending is more limited, but the situation could change rapidly with China and Russia giving clear signs of a stronger than ever strategic partnership.

By: Alicia García-Herrero and Jianwei Xu Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: November 18, 2019
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Blog Post

China’s growing presence on the Russian market and what it means for the European Union

The European Union’s relationship with Russia is strained, but the two economies are nevertheless highly intertwined. A huge share of Russia’s exports go to the EU, while in the early 2000s, EU countries supplied more than half of Russia’s imports. The EU is also a major investor in, and lender to, Russia.

By: Alicia García-Herrero and Jianwei Xu Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: November 6, 2019
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Blog Post

A Fear of Regime Change is Slowing the Global Economy

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By: Uri Dadush Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: October 25, 2019
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Working Paper

EU trade policy amid the China-US clash: caught in the crossfire?

What risks face the EU with regard to China’s strategic aims in trade policy and how can the EU respond? The US effort to isolate China poses particular risks for Europe. How can the EU counter such efforts with the aim of forging its own distinct trade policy? How should the EU move forward with reform of the World Trade Organization (WTO) in light of differing demands and aims of trading blocs like China and the US?

By: Anabel González and Nicolas Véron Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: September 17, 2019
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Blog Post

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The incoming Commission President has put support for SMEs at the centre of her economic programme. A public-private fund investing in initial public offerings should be carefully targeted, primarily at small firms with risky projects. The announced SME strategy and further measures under the Capital Markets Union programme should address numerous other barriers to both public and private equity finance.

By: Alexander Lehmann Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: September 16, 2019
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Opinion

Germany’s Divided Soul

Eastern Germans vote, think, and feel differently than western Germans do, as the results of the September 1 regional elections make clear. To help tackle the underlying economic causes of this divide, the federal government should introduce incentives to encourage foreign investment in the east of the country.

By: Dalia Marin Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: September 13, 2019
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Opinion

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The Hong Kong economy has been hit by a series of shocks, but it should resist taking drastic measures to keep foreign capital in the city.

By: Alicia García-Herrero Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: September 13, 2019
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Past Event

Past Event

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This is a closed-door workshop jointly organised by MERICS and Bruegel looking at China-EU investment relations.

Speakers: Miguel Ceballos Barón, Alicia García-Herrero, Mikko Huotari, Yi Huang and Xu Sitao Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation, Global Economics & Governance Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: September 9, 2019
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Blog Post

Hong Kong’s economy is still important to the Mainland, at least financially

Hong Kong’s current situation is important for the world in as far as its role as major offshore financial centre is key for China’s inbound and outbound investment and financing. Capital outflows from Hong Kong are especially risky given Hong Kong's so far useful but rigid monetary regime, namely a peg to the USD under a currency board

By: Alicia García-Herrero and Gary Ng Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: August 19, 2019
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Blog Post

China’s investment in Africa: What the data really says, and the implications for Europe

China has clearly signalled to Europe that it does not shy away from involvement in Africa, historically Europe’s area of influence. But the nature of China’s direct investment flows to the continent will have to change if they are to prove sustainable.

By: Alicia García-Herrero and Jianwei Xu Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: July 22, 2019
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