Past Event

The impact of Brexit for Research & Innovation in Europe

This event featured a new and interactive format, with a restricted and high-level on-site audience and in parallel, it has been livestreamed on our website to remain public and attract the widest participation.

Date: December 12, 2017, 12:30 pm Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy

Video & Audio Materials


Summary

The panel presented the current state of affairs with regards to the Research & Innovation (R&I) policy for the EU27 and the UK. They also discussed the factors underlying this situation. Even though the case for collaborative R&I investment is economically sound for both the UK and the EU when looking at short-terms horizons, there is a consensus that R&I policy is much more than just about money. Beyond EU’s direct funding, benefits are also found in the numerous transnational collaborations that are not funded by governments, but rather facilitated by the free movement of people and regulatory harmonization. Panellists highlighted that UK-EU collaboration was also key for contributing to the relevance of European research worldwide and sustaining a historically unique atmosphere for cooperative technological progress.

There was nevertheless a clear understanding that R&I policy would be a second-order concern in the Brexit negotiations. Indeed, the crux of the Brexit issue is the free movement of people, not R&I, similar to the 2014 Swiss referendum on mass immigration. Given the all-or-nothing red lines drawn by both negotiating parties, R&I collaboration and access to the European Research Area might become bargaining chips for the negotiations. Whether there is the political will on either side is also an open question. While UK-EU R&I relationship has been mutually beneficial collectively, a few stakeholders on both sides might individually benefit from the separation. This undermines the possibility for the R&I community to coherently influence the political debate, contrary to the Swiss referendum case where active advocacy on both sides was somewhat effective.

Beyond this state of affairs, one avenue of progress would be for the EU to proactively design its international R&I cooperation policy. Given its current inability to engage e.g. US institutions and the declining share of international applications in Horizon 2020 compared to the previous framework programme, Brexit might well become the trigger for the EU to finally develop an effective R&I international cooperation strategy. Rather than tailoring it to the case of the UK, the EU should think strategically of ways to engage all global partners and then suggest a similar partnership to the UK.

Event notes by Nicolas Moës, Research Assistant.

Schedule

Dec 12, 2017

12:30-13:00

Check in and lunch

13:00-14:00

Panel Discussion

Chair: Matt Dann, Secretary General

Alastair Buchan, Head of Brexit Strategy, University of Oxford

Kurt Deketelaere, Secretary General, LERU, Professor of Law at KU Leuven and Chairman of Sustainability College Bruges

David Earnshaw, Associate Vice President, MSD

Maryline Fiaschi, Managing Director, Science|Business

Martin Muller, Co-Head of Office, Swiss Contact Office for Education, Research and Innovation

Christian Naczinsky, Head of department EU and OECD Research Policy, Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy

Reinhilde Veugelers, Senior Fellow

14:00-14:30

Q&A

14:30

End

Speakers

Alastair Buchan

Head of Brexit Strategy, University of Oxford

Matt Dann

Secretary General

David Earnshaw

Associate Vice President, MSD

Kurt Deketelaere

Secretary General, LERU, Professor of Law at KU Leuven and Chairman of Sustainability College Bruges

Maryline Fiaschi

Managing Director, Science|Business

Martin Muller

Co-Head of Office, Swiss Contact Office for Education, Research and Innovation

Christian Naczinsky

Head of department EU and OECD Research Policy, Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy

Reinhilde Veugelers

Senior Fellow

Location & Contact

Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels

Matilda Sevon

matilda.sevon@bruegel.org

Read article More on this topic More by this author

Opinion

Brexit and Finance: Brace for No Impact?

Amid the daily high drama of Brexit, it is easy to lose track of the structural shifts, or lack thereof, that may be associated with the UK’s possible departure from the European Union. One of them, and not the least, is the potential impact on the European and global financial system.

By: Nicolas Véron Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: October 14, 2019
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Podcast

Podcast

Brexit: a European Odyssey

Nicholas Barrett and Guntram Wolff talk to Kalypso Nicolaïdis, author of Exodus, Reckoning, Sacrifice: Three Meanings of Brexit. Together they discuss the mythology that binds Britain to continental Europe

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: October 11, 2019
Read about event More on this topic

Upcoming Event

Oct
22
12:00

COP 21 RIPPLES: What are the key elements of an adequate global response?

The Dialogue focuses on technology, finance, industrial transformations and the political economy, which are identified by COP21 RIPPLES as key leverage points for triggering transformation.

Speakers: Michel Colombier, Marta Torres-Gunfaus, Henri Waisman and Georg Zachmann Topic: Energy & Climate Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

Questions to Mariya Gabriel the Commissioner-designate for Innovation and Youth

European Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen disseminated her mission letters to commissioner-designates. The letter to the commissioner-designate for Innovation and Youth, Mariya Gabriel, highlights several essential priorities, yet they leave a number of important questions open that I recommend Members of the European Parliament to ask at the upcoming parliamentary hearings of the designates.

By: Reinhilde Veugelers Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: September 26, 2019
Read article More on this topic

Blog Post

Libra: possible risks in Facebook's pursuit of a 'stablecoin'

Facebook’s new cryptocurrency has the potential to be both widely accessible and attractive to those countries that do not have strong sovereign currencies. So far regulators have treated such currencies as a minor risk to national economics, but the Libra could change everything.

By: Maria Demertzis and Jan Mazza Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: July 17, 2019
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

How should the relationship between competition policy and industrial policy evolve in the European Union?

Competition policy aims to ensure that market practices and strategies do not reduce consumer welfare. Industrial policy, meanwhile, aims at securing framework conditions that are favourable to industrial competitiveness, and deals with (sector-specific) production rules as well as the direction of public funds and tax measures. But, how should competition policy and industrial policy interact? Is industrial policy contradicting the aims of competition policy by promoting specific industrial interests?

By: Georgios Petropoulos Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: July 15, 2019
Read about event More on this topic

Past Event

Past Event

The 4th industrial revolution: opportunities and challenges for Europe and China

What is the current status of EU-China relations concerning innovation, and what might their future look like?

Speakers: Elżbieta Bieńkowska, Chen Dongxiao, Patrick Child, Eric Cornuel, Maria Demertzis, Ding Yuan, Luigi Gambardella, Jiang Jianqing, Frank Kirchner, Pascal Lamy, Li Mingjun, Gwenn Sonck, Gerard Van Schaik, Reinhilde Veugelers, Wang Hongjian, Guntram B. Wolff, Xu Bin, Zhang Hongjun and Zhou Snow Topic: Global Economics & Governance Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: July 12, 2019
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Opinion

Brexit banking exodus creates a dilemma for Dublin

Irish consumers’ interests may not coincide with the needs of banks relocating here.

By: Rebecca Christie Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: July 10, 2019
Read about event More on this topic

Past Event

Past Event

Eurozone agreement: a mini revolution?

What does the new Eurozone budget do, and what does it not do? What are its strengths and weaknesses?

Speakers: Bruno Le Maire and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: July 8, 2019
Read article More on this topic More by this author

Blog Post

Where Brexit goes, the law shall follow

How the financial industry and the law firms that support it are preparing for what comes next

By: Rebecca Christie Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: June 25, 2019
Read about event More on this topic

Past Event

Past Event

Tech-enabled payment processes: policy implications of new developments

What challenges does a shift towards new payment processes imply for EU financial services policy?

Speakers: Rebecca Christie, Etienne Goosse, Chirag Patel, Jörn-Jakob Röber, Johannes Vermeire and Nicolas Véron Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: June 25, 2019
Read about event More on this topic

Past Event

Past Event

How comprehensive is the EU political realignment?

Has the left-right divide become obsolete in EU politics?

Speakers: David Amiel, Otilia Dhand, Nicolas Véron and Silke Wettach Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: June 25, 2019
Load more posts