Past Event

The role of China in global value chains

This event looked at how the rise of China is affecting global value chains.

Date: November 18, 2019, 8:30 am Topic: Global Economics & Governance

audio and video recordings

Event marterials

Presentation by Alicia Garcia-Herrero

Presentation by Margit Molnar

The rise of China has transformed the global value chain, driven by its asymmetric trade relationship with the world. China’s rise for the most part does not benefit Asia and has lessened its integration with the region. While EU members states are integrating more with China, at least in terms of value chain, this comes at the expense of reduced regional trade integration. Meanwhile the US, which is following the same pattern as Asia and Europe in its relation with China’s value chain, has embarked in a trade war with China with special focus on China’s increasing dominance in the value chain.

Schedule

Nov 18, 2019

8:30-9:00

Check-in and breakfast

9:00-9:20

Presentation

Alicia García-Herrero, Senior Fellow

9:20-10:10

Comments and panel discussion

Chair: Guntram B. Wolff, Director

Alicia García-Herrero, Senior Fellow

Seamus Grimes, Emeritus professor, Whitaker Institute for Innovation and Societal Change, National University of Ireland [Joining remotely]

Margit Molnar, Head of the China Desk, OECD Economics Department

10:10-10:30

Q&A

10:30

End

Speakers

Alicia García-Herrero

Senior Fellow

Seamus Grimes

Emeritus professor, Whitaker Institute for Innovation and Societal Change, National University of Ireland [Joining remotely]

Margit Molnar

Head of the China Desk, OECD Economics Department

Guntram B. Wolff

Director

Location & Contact

Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels

Matilda Sevon

matilda.sevon@bruegel.org

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