Past Event

Better policies for people on the move

This event discussed the impact and integration of migrants as well as national and European immigration policy challenges.

Date: December 13, 2017, 11:00 am Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance

video recording


Since the early 1990s, immigration has been a more important source of population increase in the EU than the natural change due to births and deaths, while in recent years Europe is facing a large inflow of refugees. At the same time, Eurobarometer opinion surveys reveal that immigration tops the list of challenges that EU citizens are most concerned about and therefore effective policies toward immigration are more important now than ever.

How serious are Europe’s immigration challenges? What are the best experiences in integrating immigrants? What hurdles complicate the financial inclusion of refugees? What’s the impact of immigration on European labour markets, the economy and public finances? How effective is Europe’s response to the large inflow of refugees and how to best address the challenges of immigration?

This event has been made possible with the kind support of the MasterCard Center for Inclusive Growth.

event material

Report: People on the move: Impact and integration of migrants in the European Union by Uuriintuya Batsaikhan, Zsolt Darvas and Inês Gonçalves Raposo

Presentation by Zsolt Darvas

SUMMARY

Session 1: Impact and integration of migrants in the European Union

The impact of migration is as positive as the success of integration policies. There is no “one-size fits all” policy – transferring best practices across countries is in itself rather challenging due to institutional, cultural and economic differences. Nonetheless, there are ten points that can be withdrawn from the discussion:

  1. A European identity document for migrants and refugees linked to a pan-european registry would tackle the current problem of unidentified migration.
  2. Early access to integration measures has been shown to have a lasting positive effect. Therefore, early intervention through e.g. language training should be prioritized.
  3. Linguistic policies should be tailored to the linguistic distances between immigrant languages and the host country and involve not only the migrant worker but all his or her surrounding community.
  4. The employers are often left aside from the integration discussion. Providing support to employers in tackling obstacles such as complex bureaucracy can facilitate hiring of migrants.
  5. Labour market integration is an investment without an immediate payoff. Having a long-term perspective is crucial to avoid wasted potential.
  6. Legal acceptance and later labour market integration is highly conditional on the type for immigration – from asylum, subsidiary protection to humanitarian reasons. The “gate of entry gap” needs to be addressed through tailoring integration policies to the different types of migrants.
  7. Provide sensitivity training to the native-born, focusing on issues such as non-verbal communication, can improve openness and reception of immigrants.
  8. Changing mindsets is no easy task. Acknowledging that European citizens have behind them centuries of years of net emigration and only recently the figures have changed may be a first step for lining perceptions.
  9. Financial literacy policies play an important role in fostering financial inclusion of migrants.
  10. Partnerships for the development of origin third-countries are key.

Events notes by Inês Goncalves Raposo, Research Assistant. 

 

Schedule

Dec 13, 2017

10:30-11:00

Check-in and welcome coffee

11:00-12:45

Session 1: Impact and integration of migrants in the European Union

Chair: Maria Demertzis, Deputy Director, Bruegel

Zsolt Darvas, Senior Fellow

Eva Degler, Policy analyst, Employment, Labour and Social Affairs Directorate, OECD

Arjen Leerkes, Associate Professor, Sociology Department, Erasmus University Rotterdam

Rainer Münz, Adviser on Migration and Demography, European Commission, European Political Strategy Centre

Alessandra Venturini, Deputy Director Migration Policy Center, Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, European University Institute (EUI)

12:45-13:30

Lunch

13:30-14:45

Session 2: National and European immigration policy challenges

Chair: Guntram B. Wolff, Director

Manu Bhardwaj, Vice President for Research and Insights, Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth

Elizabeth Collett, Director of Migration Policy Institute Europe

Matthias Oel, Director for Migration, Mobility and Innovation, European Commission, DG HOME

14:45

End

Speakers

Manu Bhardwaj

Vice President for Research and Insights, Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth

Elizabeth Collett

Director of Migration Policy Institute Europe

Zsolt Darvas

Senior Fellow

Eva Degler

Policy analyst, Employment, Labour and Social Affairs Directorate, OECD

Maria Demertzis

Deputy Director, Bruegel

Arjen Leerkes

Associate Professor, Sociology Department, Erasmus University Rotterdam

Rainer Münz

Adviser on Migration and Demography, European Commission, European Political Strategy Centre

Matthias Oel

Director for Migration, Mobility and Innovation, European Commission, DG HOME

Alessandra Venturini

Deputy Director Migration Policy Center, Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, European University Institute (EUI)

Guntram B. Wolff

Director

Location & Contact

Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels

Matilda Sevon

matilda.sevon@bruegel.org

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